Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10137/8078
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Title: The Removal of Subterranean Stormwater Drain Sumps as Mosquito Breeding Sites in Darwin, Australia.
Authors: Warchot, Allan
Whelan, Peter
Brown, John
Vincent, Tony
Carter, Jane
Kurucz, Nina
Citation: Tropical medicine and infectious disease 2020-01-10; 5(1)
Abstract: The Northern Territory Top End Health Service, Medical Entomology Section and the City of Darwin council carry out a joint Mosquito Engineering Program targeting the rectification of mosquito breeding sites in the City of Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia. In 2005, an investigation into potential subterranean stormwater breeding sites in the City of Darwin commenced, specifically targeting roadside stormwater side entry pits. There were 79 side entry pits randomly investigated for mosquito breeding in the Darwin suburbs of Nightcliff and Rapid Creek, with 69.6% of the pits containing water holding sumps, and 45.6% of those water holding sumps breeding endemic mosquitoes. Culexquinquefasciatus was the most common mosquito collected, accounting for 73% of all mosquito identifications, with the potential vector mosquito Aedesnotoscriptus also recovered from a small number of sumps. The sumps were also considered potential dry season maintenance breeding sites for important exotic Aedes mosquitoes such as Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus, which are potential vectors of dengue, chickungunya and Zika virus. Overall, 1229 side entry pits were inspected in ten Darwin suburbs from 2005 to 2008, with 180 water holding sumps identified and rectified by concrete filling.
Click to open PubMed article: https://www.ezpdhcs.nt.gov.au/login?url=https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31936813
Click to open Pubmed Article: https://www.ezpdhcs.nt.gov.au/login?url=https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31936813
Journal title: Tropical medicine and infectious disease
Publication Date: 2020-01-10
Type: Journal Article
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10137/8078
DOI: 10.3390/tropicalmed5010009
metadata.dc.identifier.orcid: 0000-0002-0120-6305
Appears in Collections:(a) NT Health Research Collection

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