Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10137/7198
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTurpin Jen
dc.contributor.authorYurick Den
dc.contributor.authorKhoury Gen
dc.contributor.authorPham Hen
dc.contributor.authorLocarnini Sen
dc.contributor.authorMelamed Aen
dc.contributor.authorWitkover Aen
dc.contributor.authorWilson Ken
dc.contributor.authorPurcell Den
dc.contributor.authorBangham CRMen
dc.contributor.authorEinsiedel LJen
dc.date2018en
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-12T04:45:57Zen
dc.date.available2018-11-12T04:45:57Zen
dc.date.issued2018-10-11en
dc.identifier.citationThe Journal of infectious diseases 2018-10-11en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10137/7198en
dc.description.abstractThe prevalence of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) coinfection is high in certain Indigenous Australian populations, but its impact on HTLV-1 has not been described. We compared 2 groups of Indigenous adults infected with HTLV-1, either alone or coinfected with HBV. The 2 groups had a similar HTLV-1 proviral load, but there was a significant increase in clonal expansion of HTLV-1-infected lymphocytes in coinfected asymptomatic individuals. The degree of clonal expansion was correlated with the titer of HBV surface antigen. We conclude that HTLV-1/HBV coinfection may predispose to HTLV-1-associated malignant disease.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.titleImpact of Hepatitis B Virus Coinfection on Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Clonality in an Indigenous Population of Central Australia.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journaltitleThe Journal of infectious diseasesen
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/infdis/jiy546en
dc.identifier.pubmedidhttps://www.ezpdhcs.nt.gov.au/login?url=https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed//30307560en
dc.identifier.affiliationSection of Virology, Division of Infectious Diseases, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom..en
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, Melbourne, Victoria..en
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, Melbourne, Victoria..en
dc.identifier.affiliationBaker Heart and Diabetes Institute Central Australia, Alice Springs Hospital, Northern Territory, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia..en
dc.identifier.affiliationVictorian Infectious Diseases Reference Laboratory, Doherty Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia..en
dc.identifier.affiliationSection of Virology, Division of Infectious Diseases, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom..en
dc.identifier.affiliationSection of Virology, Division of Infectious Diseases, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom..en
dc.identifier.affiliationNational Serological Reference Laboratory, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia..en
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, Melbourne, Victoria..en
dc.identifier.affiliationSection of Virology, Division of Infectious Diseases, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom..en
dc.identifier.affiliationBaker Heart and Diabetes Institute Central Australia, Alice Springs Hospital, Northern Territory, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia..en
Appears in Collections:(a) NT Health Research Collection

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in ePublications are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Google Media

Google ScholarTM

Who's citing