Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10137/5581
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dc.contributor.authorFrommer DJen
dc.contributor.authorFernandes DKen
dc.contributor.authorPawar Gen
dc.contributor.authorGoud Ren
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-15T23:01:15Zen
dc.date.available2018-05-15T23:01:15Zen
dc.date.issued2014-06en
dc.identifier.citationInternal medicine journal 2014-06; 44(6): 605-9en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10137/5581en
dc.description.abstractThis study documents the symptoms, racial distribution, pathological findings and outcomes of patients diagnosed with gastrointestinal amyloidosis in Alice Springs Hospital. In a 4 year retrospective survey. 9 patients, all indigenous, 7F/2M, had biopsy proven gastrointestinal amyloidosis. Four out of four patients tested were found to have AA amyloidosis. Presenting symptoms included diarrhoea, bloody in some, vomiting and abdominal pain. All but one had diabetes mellitus, type 2. Multiple infections were common and most patients had low serum albumin and transferrin concentrations but high serum ferritin concentrations. Five of the patients died, and the gastrointestinal symptoms of the remaining 4 remitted. Gastrointestinal amyloidosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of indigenous patients presenting with chronic diarrhoea, vomiting or abdominal pain. It carries a grave prognosis, is probably secondary to chronic infections but is potentially reversible.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectamyloidosisen
dc.subjectindigenousen
dc.subjectpathologyen
dc.subjectprognosisen
dc.subjectsymptomen
dc.titleGastrointestinal amyloidosis in Australian indigenous patients.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journaltitleInternal medicine journalen
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/imj.12450en
dc.identifier.pubmedidhttps://www.ezpdhcs.nt.gov.au/login?url=https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed//24946817en
dc.subject.meshAbdominal Painen
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen
dc.subject.meshAmyloidosisen
dc.subject.meshBacterial Infectionsen
dc.subject.meshC-Reactive Proteinen
dc.subject.meshCandidiasisen
dc.subject.meshCardiovascular Diseasesen
dc.subject.meshComorbidityen
dc.subject.meshDeltaretrovirus Infectionsen
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitus, Type 2en
dc.subject.meshDiarrheaen
dc.subject.meshDyslipidemiasen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshFerritinsen
dc.subject.meshGastrointestinal Diseasesen
dc.subject.meshGastrointestinal Hemorrhageen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshHypoalbuminemiaen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshNorthern Territoryen
dc.subject.meshPrognosisen
dc.subject.meshRenal Insufficiency, Chronicen
dc.subject.meshSerum Amyloid A Proteinen
dc.subject.meshTransferrinen
dc.subject.meshVomitingen
dc.subject.meshOceanic Ancestry Groupen
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Medicine, Alice Springs Hospital, Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia..en
dc.identifier.pubmedurihttps://www.ezpdhcs.nt.gov.au/login?url=https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed//24946817en
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