Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10137/5457
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dc.contributor.authorPoespoprodjo JRen
dc.contributor.authorFobia Wen
dc.contributor.authorKenangalem Een
dc.contributor.authorLampah DAen
dc.contributor.authorSugiarto Pen
dc.contributor.authorTjitra Een
dc.contributor.authorAnstey NMen
dc.contributor.authorPrice RNen
dc.date2015en
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-15T23:00:57Zen
dc.date.available2018-05-15T23:00:57Zen
dc.date.issued2015-07-15en
dc.identifier.citationMalaria journal 2015-07-15; 14: 272en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10137/5457en
dc.description.abstractIn Papua, Indonesia, maternal malaria is prevalent, multidrug resistant and associated with adverse outcomes for mother and baby. In March 2006, anti-malarial policy was revised for the second and third trimester of pregnancy to dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHP) for all species of malaria. This study presents the temporal analysis of adverse outcomes in pregnancy and early life following this policy change. From April 2004 to May 2010, a standardized questionnaire was used to collect information from all pregnant women admitted to the maternity ward. A physical examination was performed on all live birth newborns. The relative risks (RR) and the associated population attributable risks (PAR) of adverse outcomes in women with a history of malaria treatment to the risk in those without a history of malaria during the current pregnancy were examined to evaluate the temporal trends before and after DHP deployment. Of 6,556 women enrolled with known pregnancy outcome, 1,018 (16%) reported prior anti-malarial treatment during their pregnancy. The proportion of women with malaria reporting treatment with DHP rose from 0% in 2004 to 64% (121/189) in 2010. In those with history of malaria during pregnancy, the increasing use of DHP was associated with a 54% fall in the proportion of maternal malaria at delivery and a 98% decrease in congenital malaria (from 7.1% prior to 0.1% after policy change). Overall policy change to more effective treatment was associated with an absolute 2% reduction of maternal severe anaemia and absolute 4.5% decrease in low birth weight babies. Introduction of highly effective treatment in pregnancy was associated with a reduction of maternal malaria at delivery and improved neonatal outcomes. Ensuring universal access to arteminisin combination therapy (ACT) in pregnancy in an area of multidrug resistance has potential to impact significantly on maternal and infant health.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.titleTreatment policy change to dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine contributes to the reduction of adverse maternal and pregnancy outcomes.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journaltitleMalaria journalen
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12936-015-0794-0en
dc.identifier.pubmedidhttps://www.ezpdhcs.nt.gov.au/login?url=https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed//26169783en
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAntimalarialsen
dc.subject.meshArtemisininsen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIndonesiaen
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen
dc.subject.meshMalariaen
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Complications, Parasiticen
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Outcomeen
dc.subject.meshQuinolinesen
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten
dc.identifier.affiliationMimika District Health Authority, District Government Building, Jl. Cendrawasih, Timika, 99910, Papua, Indonesia. didot2266@yahoo.com.. Timika Malaria Research Programme, Papuan Health and Community Development Foundation, Jl. SP2-SP5, RSMM Area, Timika, 99910, Papua, Indonesia. didot2266@yahoo.com.. Department of Child Health, Faculty of Medicine, University Gadjah Mada, Jl. Kesehatan no 1, Sekip, Yogyakarta, 55284, Indonesia. didot2266@yahoo.com..en
dc.identifier.affiliationTimika Malaria Research Programme, Papuan Health and Community Development Foundation, Jl. SP2-SP5, RSMM Area, Timika, 99910, Papua, Indonesia. timikaresearchfacility@gmail.com..en
dc.identifier.affiliationMimika District Health Authority, District Government Building, Jl. Cendrawasih, Timika, 99910, Papua, Indonesia. ennykenangalem@yahoo.com.. Timika Malaria Research Programme, Papuan Health and Community Development Foundation, Jl. SP2-SP5, RSMM Area, Timika, 99910, Papua, Indonesia. ennykenangalem@yahoo.com..en
dc.identifier.affiliationTimika Malaria Research Programme, Papuan Health and Community Development Foundation, Jl. SP2-SP5, RSMM Area, Timika, 99910, Papua, Indonesia. aditimika@yahoo.com..en
dc.identifier.affiliationMitra Masyarakat Hospital, Jl. SP2-SP5-Charitas, Timika, 99910, Indonesia. sugiartopaulus@gmail.com..en
dc.identifier.affiliationNational Institute of Health Research and Development, Ministry of Health, Jl. Percetakan Negara, Jakarta, 10560, Indonesia. emil@litbang.depkes.go.id..en
dc.identifier.affiliationGlobal and Tropical Health Division, Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, PO Box 41096, Casuarina, NT, 0811, Australia. nicholas.anstey@menzies.edu.au.. Division of Medicine, Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin, NT, 0810, Australia. nicholas.anstey@menzies.edu.au..en
dc.identifier.affiliationGlobal and Tropical Health Division, Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, PO Box 41096, Casuarina, NT, 0811, Australia. rprice@menzies.edu.au.. Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX37LJ, UK. rprice@menzies.edu.au..en
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