Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10137/5434
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dc.contributor.authorWilliams Sen
dc.contributor.authorPatel Men
dc.contributor.authorMarkey Pen
dc.contributor.authorMuller Ren
dc.contributor.authorBenedict Sen
dc.contributor.authorRoss Ien
dc.contributor.authorHeuzenroeder Men
dc.contributor.authorDavos Den
dc.contributor.authorCameron Sen
dc.contributor.authorKrause VLen
dc.date2015en
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-15T23:00:53Zen
dc.date.available2018-05-15T23:00:53Zen
dc.date.issued2015-12en
dc.identifier.citationThe Journal of infection 2015-12; 71(6): 642-8en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10137/5434en
dc.description.abstractTo determine the prevalence of Salmonella in the environment of case and control houses, and compare serovars isolated from cases and their houses. From 2005 to 2008, we tested samples from houses of 0-4 year old cases and community controls in Darwin and Palmerston for Salmonella. Case isolates were compared with environmental isolates. S. Ball and S. Urbana isolates were compared using Multiple Amplification of Phage Locus Typing (MAPLT) and Multiple-Locus Variable number of tandem repeat Analysis (MLVA). Salmonella were found in 47/65 (72%) case houses and 18/29 (62%) control houses; these proportions were not significantly different. In 21/47 (45%) houses, case and environmental isolates (from animal faeces, soil and vacuums) were indistinguishable. Multiple serovars were isolated from 20 (31%) case and 6 (21%) control houses. All but one environmental isolate are known human pathogens in the Northern Territory (NT). Each of the four pairs of S. Ball and S. Urbana were indistinguishable. Animal faeces were the most likely source of salmonellosis in cases. The similar prevalence of house isolates suggests that Salmonella is ubiquitous in this environment. The distinction of S. Ball and S. Urbana subtypes enabled linkage of human illness to environmental exposure. Environmental contamination with Salmonella is an important source of sporadic infection in children in the tropics.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectAnimalsen
dc.subjectBacterial typing techniques/methodsen
dc.subjectChildrenen
dc.subjectFaecesen
dc.subjectInfanten
dc.subjectSalmonellaen
dc.subjectSalmonella infectionsen
dc.subjectSerogroupen
dc.subjectSoilen
dc.subjectVacuum cleaneren
dc.titleSalmonella in the tropical household environment--Everyday, everywhere.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journaltitleThe Journal of infectionen
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jinf.2015.09.011en
dc.identifier.pubmedidhttps://www.ezpdhcs.nt.gov.au/login?url=https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed//26416474en
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen
dc.subject.meshAustraliaen
dc.subject.meshBacterial Typing Techniquesen
dc.subject.meshBacteriophage Typingen
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studiesen
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshElectrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Fielden
dc.subject.meshFamily Characteristicsen
dc.subject.meshFecesen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen
dc.subject.meshSalmonellaen
dc.subject.meshSalmonella Infectionsen
dc.subject.meshSerogroupen
dc.subject.meshSoil Microbiologyen
dc.subject.meshTropical Climateen
dc.identifier.affiliationCentre for Disease Control (CDC), Northern Territory Department of Health and Community Services (NTDHCS), Darwin, Northern Territory (NT), Australia; National Centre for Epidemiology and Public Health (NCEPH), Australian National University (ANU), Canberra, Australian Capital Territory (ACT), Australia. Electronic address: shelleewilliams75@gmail.com..en
dc.identifier.affiliationNational Centre for Epidemiology and Public Health (NCEPH), Australian National University (ANU), Canberra, Australian Capital Territory (ACT), Australia. Electronic address: Mahomed.Patel@anu.edu.au..en
dc.identifier.affiliationCentre for Disease Control (CDC), Northern Territory Department of Health and Community Services (NTDHCS), Darwin, Northern Territory (NT), Australia. Electronic address: Peter.Markey@nt.gov.au..en
dc.identifier.affiliationCentre for Disease Control (CDC), Northern Territory Department of Health and Community Services (NTDHCS), Darwin, Northern Territory (NT), Australia. Electronic address: RosanneMuller@hotmail.com..en
dc.identifier.affiliationBerrimah Veterinary Laboratories, NT Department of Resources (DoR), Darwin, NT, Australia. Electronic address: Suresh.Benedict@nt.gov.au..en
dc.identifier.affiliationPublic Health Unit, Microbiology & Infectious Diseases, SA Pathology, Adelaide, South Australia (SA), Australia. Electronic address: Ian.Ross@health.sa.gov.au..en
dc.identifier.affiliationPublic Health Unit, Microbiology & Infectious Diseases, SA Pathology, Adelaide, South Australia (SA), Australia. Electronic address: mheuzenr@gmail.com..en
dc.identifier.affiliationPublic Health Unit, Microbiology & Infectious Diseases, SA Pathology, Adelaide, South Australia (SA), Australia. Electronic address: dianned@internode.on.net..en
dc.identifier.affiliationNational Centre for Epidemiology and Public Health (NCEPH), Australian National University (ANU), Canberra, Australian Capital Territory (ACT), Australia. Electronic address: Scott.Cameron@adelaide.edu.au..en
dc.identifier.affiliationCentre for Disease Control (CDC), Northern Territory Department of Health and Community Services (NTDHCS), Darwin, Northern Territory (NT), Australia. Electronic address: Vicki.Krause@nt.gov.au..en
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