Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10137/5367
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dc.contributor.authorMcMahon Een
dc.contributor.authorClarke Ren
dc.contributor.authorJaenke Ren
dc.contributor.authorBrimblecombe JKen
dc.date2016en
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-15T23:00:45Zen
dc.date.available2018-05-15T23:00:45Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-16en
dc.identifier.citationNutrients 2016-03-16; 8(3): 169en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10137/5367en
dc.description.abstractFood reformulation is an important strategy to reduce the excess salt intake observed in remote Indigenous Australia. We aimed to examine whether 12.5% and 25% salt reduction in bread is detectable, and, if so, whether acceptability is changed, in a sample of adults living in a remote Indigenous community in the Northern Territory of Australia. Convenience samples were recruited for testing of reduced-salt (300 and 350 mg Na/100 g) versus Standard (~400 mg Na/100 g) white and wholemeal breads (n = 62 for white; n = 72 for wholemeal). Triangle testing was used to examine whether participants could detect a difference between the breads. Liking of each bread was also measured; standard consumer acceptability questionnaires were modified to maximise cultural appropriateness and understanding. Participants were unable to detect a difference between Standard and reduced-salt breads (all p values > 0.05 when analysed using binomial probability). Further, as expected, liking of the breads was not changed with salt reduction (all p values > 0.05 when analysed using ANOVA). Reducing salt in products commonly purchased in remote Indigenous communities has potential as an equitable, cost-effective and sustainable strategy to reduce population salt intake and reduce risk of chronic disease, without the barriers associated with strategies that require individual behaviour change.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectIndigenous Australian consumersen
dc.subjectacceptanceen
dc.subjectbreaden
dc.subjectdetectionen
dc.subjectreformulationen
dc.subjectsalten
dc.titleDetection of 12.5% and 25% Salt Reduction in Bread in a Remote Indigenous Australian Community.en
dc.typeComparative Studyen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journaltitleNutrientsen
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/nu8030169en
dc.identifier.pubmedidhttps://www.ezpdhcs.nt.gov.au/login?url=https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed//26999196en
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshBreaden
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshNorthern Territoryen
dc.subject.meshOceanic Ancestry Groupen
dc.subject.meshSodium Chloride, Dietaryen
dc.subject.meshSurveys and Questionnairesen
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten
dc.subject.meshConsumer Behavioren
dc.subject.meshDiet, Sodium-Restricteden
dc.subject.meshFood Preferencesen
dc.subject.meshTaste Perceptionen
dc.identifier.affiliationWellbeing and Chronic Disease Division, Menzies School of Health Research, John Mathews Building, Royal Darwin Hospital Campus, Rocklands Dr, Darwin NT 0810, Australia. e.j.mcmahon@outlook.com.. Division of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, 101 Currie St, Adelaide SA 5001, Australia. e.j.mcmahon@outlook.com..en
dc.identifier.affiliationGoodman Fielder, 39 Delhi Rd, North Ryde NSW 2113, Australia. Rozlynne.Clarke@goodmanfielder.com.au..en
dc.identifier.affiliationWellbeing and Chronic Disease Division, Menzies School of Health Research, John Mathews Building, Royal Darwin Hospital Campus, Rocklands Dr, Darwin NT 0810, Australia. Rachael.Jaenke@menzies.edu.au.. Division of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, 101 Currie St, Adelaide SA 5001, Australia. Rachael.Jaenke@menzies.edu.au..en
dc.identifier.affiliationWellbeing and Chronic Disease Division, Menzies School of Health Research, John Mathews Building, Royal Darwin Hospital Campus, Rocklands Dr, Darwin NT 0810, Australia. Julie.Brimblecombe@menzies.edu.au..en
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