Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10137/5310
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dc.contributor.authorTsai, Dannyen
dc.contributor.authorStewart, Penelopeen
dc.contributor.authorGoud, Rajendraen
dc.contributor.authorGourley, Stephenen
dc.contributor.authorHewagama, Saliyaen
dc.contributor.authorKrishnaswamy, Sushenaen
dc.contributor.authorWallis, Steven Cen
dc.contributor.authorLipman, Jeffreyen
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Jason Aen
dc.date2016en
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-15T23:00:39Zen
dc.date.available2018-05-15T23:00:39Zen
dc.date.issued2016-12en
dc.identifier.citationInternational journal of antimicrobial agents 2016-12; 48(6): 748-752en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10137/5310en
dc.description.abstractIn the absence of specific data to guide optimal dosing, this study aimed to describe the pharmacokinetics of ceftriaxone in severely septic Australian Indigenous patients and to assess achievement of the pharmacodynamic target of the regimens prescribed. A pharmacokinetic study was conducted in a remote hospital intensive care unit in patients receiving ceftriaxone dosing of 1 g every 12 h (q12h). Serial blood and urine samples were collected over one dosing interval on two consecutive days. Samples were assayed using a validated chromatography method for total and unbound concentrations. Concentration-time data collected were analysed with a non-compartmental approach. A total of 100 plasma samples were collected from five subjects. Ceftriaxone clearance, volume of distribution at steady-state, elimination half-life and elimination rate constant estimates were 0.9 (0.6-1.5) L/h, 11.2 (7.6-13.4) L, 9.5 (3.2-10.2) h and 0.07 (0.07-0.21) h-1, respectively. The unbound fraction of ceftriaxone ranged between 14% and 43%, with a higher unbound fraction present at higher total concentrations. The unbound concentrations at 720 min from the initiation of infusion for the first and second dosing intervals were 7.2 (4.8-10.7) mg/L and 7.8 (4.7-12.1) mg/L respectively, which exceeds the minimum inhibitory concentration of all typical target pathogens. In conclusion, the regimen of ceftriaxone 1 g q12h is adequate for critically ill Australian Indigenous patients with severe sepsis caused by non-resistant pathogens.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectCritically illen
dc.subjectIndigenousen
dc.subjectPharmacokineticsen
dc.subjectSevere sepsisen
dc.subjectβ-Lactamen
dc.titleTotal and unbound ceftriaxone pharmacokinetics in critically ill Australian Indigenous patients with severe sepsis.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.typeObservational Studyen
dc.identifier.journaltitleInternational journal of antimicrobial agentsen
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijantimicag.2016.09.021en
dc.identifier.pubmedidhttps://www.ezpdhcs.nt.gov.au/login?url=https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed//27838278en
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAnti-Bacterial Agentsen
dc.subject.meshAustraliaen
dc.subject.meshCeftriaxoneen
dc.subject.meshChromatographyen
dc.subject.meshCritical Illnessen
dc.subject.meshHalf-Lifeen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIntensive Care Unitsen
dc.subject.meshMicrobial Sensitivity Testsen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshPlasmaen
dc.subject.meshPopulation Groupsen
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen
dc.subject.meshProtein Bindingen
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen
dc.subject.meshUrineen
dc.subject.meshSepsisen
dc.identifier.affiliationBurns, Trauma & Critical Care Research Centre, School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Alice Springs Hospital, Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia; Pharmacy Department, Alice Springs Hospital, Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia. Electronic address: d.tsai@uq.edu.au..en
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Intensive Care Medicine, Alice Springs Hospital, Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia..en
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Intensive Care Medicine, Alice Springs Hospital, Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia..en
dc.identifier.affiliationEmergency Department, Alice Springs Hospital, Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia..en
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Medicine, Alice Springs Hospital, Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia; Department of Infectious Diseases, The Northern Hospital, Epping, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia..en
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Medicine, Alice Springs Hospital, Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia; Monash Infectious Diseases, Monash Health, Clayton, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia..en
dc.identifier.affiliationBurns, Trauma & Critical Care Research Centre, School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia..en
dc.identifier.affiliationBurns, Trauma & Critical Care Research Centre, School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia..en
dc.identifier.affiliationBurns, Trauma & Critical Care Research Centre, School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; School of Pharmacy, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia..en
dc.identifier.pubmedurihttps://www.ezpdhcs.nt.gov.au/login?url=https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed//27838278en
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