Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10137/12342
Title: Prevalence of blood-borne viruses and hepatitis B vaccination status among haemodialysis patients in Central Australia.
Authors: Ramaswami AP
Pawar B
Pawar G
Brown M
Citation: © 2022 The Authors.
IJID Reg. 2022 Sep 27;5:111-116. doi: 10.1016/j.ijregi.2022.09.010. eCollection 2022 Dec.
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: A cross-sectional study to determine the prevalence of blood-borne viruses and hepatitis B vaccination status in haemodialysis patients in Central Australia. METHODS: Our study comprised 366 Aboriginal and 1 non-Indigenous Australian in Central Australia who had commenced haemodialysis between January 1996 and December 2019. RESULTS: Chronic hepatitis B infection was seen in 8.4% of patients, and serological evidence of human T-lymphotropic virus 1 in 28.3% of patients. The prevalence of HIV and hepatitis C was less than 1%. The vaccine status of all 182 patients who had received the hepatitis B vaccine was reviewed. Vaccine response was seen in 72.2% of patients who had received the vaccine at birth or in early childhood. There were 99 patients aged 20 years and older who had received hepatitis B vaccines before their haemodialysis commenced. Vaccine response was observed in 88.9% of these patients. A seroconversion rate of 78.5% was achieved in vaccine naïve patients who received the hepatitis B vaccine after their haemodialysis commenced. CONCLUSION: The response to the hepatitis B vaccine among haemodialysis patients in Central Australia was suboptimal and variable. The prevalence of chronic hepatitis B infection declined after the universal hepatitis B vaccination was introduced in 2000.
Click to open Pubmed Article: https://www.ezpdhcs.nt.gov.au/login?url=https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/36277500
Journal title: IJID Regions (Online)
Volume: 5
Pages: 111-116
Publication Date: 2022-12-01
Type: Journal Article
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10137/12342
DOI: 10.1016/j.ijregi.2022.09.010
Appears in Collections:(a) NT Health Research Collection

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