Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10137/12319
Title: Twelve-month mortality outcomes for Indigenous and non-Indigenous people admitted to intensive care units in Australia: a registry-based data linkage study.
Authors: Secombe P
Brown A
Bailey MJ
Huckson S
Chavan S
Litton E
Pilcher D
Citation: © 2022 The Authors. Medical Journal of Australia published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of AMPCo Pty Ltd.
Secombe PJ, Brown A, Bailey MJ, Huckson S, Chavan S, Litton E, Pilcher D. Twelve-month mortality outcomes for Indigenous and non-Indigenous people admitted to intensive care units in Australia: a registry-based data linkage study. Med J Aust. 2022 Oct 30. doi: 10.5694/mja2.51763. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 36310397.
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To compare longer term (12-month) mortality outcomes for Indigenous and non-Indigenous people admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) in Australia. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS: Retrospective registry-based data linkage cohort study; analysis of all admissions of adults (16 years or older) to Australian ICUs, 1 January 2017 - 31 December 2019, as recorded in the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society (ANZICS) Adult Patient Database (APD), linked using the SLK-581 key to National Death Index data. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Unadjusted and adjusted mortality risk, censored at twelve months from the start of index ICU admission. Secondary outcomes were unadjusted and adjusted mortality twelve months from admission to the ICU. RESULTS: The APD recorded 330 712 eligible ICU admissions during 2017-2019 (65% of all ICU admissions registered), of which 11 322 were of Indigenous people (3.4%). Median age at admission was lower for Indigenous patients (51.2 [IQR, 36.7-63.6] years) than for non-Indigenous patients (66.5 [IQR, 52.7-76.1] years). Unadjusted mortality risk was similar for Indigenous and non-Indigenous patients (hazard ratio, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.97-1.06), but was higher for Indigenous patients after adjusting for age, admission diagnosis, illness severity, hospital type, jurisdiction, remoteness and socio-economic status (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.14-1.27). Twelve-month mortality was higher for Indigenous than non-Indigenous patients (adjusted odds ratio, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.16-1.33). CONCLUSIONS: Twelve-month mortality outcomes are poorer for people admitted to ICUs in Australia than for the general population. Further, after adjusting for age and other factors, survival outcomes are poorer for Indigenous than non-Indigenous people admitted to ICUs. Critical illness may therefore contribute to shorter life expectancy among Indigenous Australians.
Click to open Pubmed Article: https://www.ezpdhcs.nt.gov.au/login?url=https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/36310397
Journal title: The Medical journal of Australia
Publication Date: 2022-10-30
Type: Journal Article
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10137/12319
DOI: 10.5694/mja2.51763
Orcid: 0000-0002-1137-0512
0000-0002-8939-7985
Appears in Collections:(a) NT Health Research Collection

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