Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10137/12221
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dc.contributor.authorSeyedshahabedin, Mohammad Men
dc.contributor.authorHowarth, Timothy Pen
dc.contributor.authorMo, Linen
dc.contributor.authorBiancardi, Edwinaen
dc.contributor.authorHeraganahally, Subash Sen
dc.date.accessioned2022-07-14T05:37:15Zen
dc.date.available2022-07-14T05:37:15Zen
dc.date.issued2022-07-05en
dc.identifier.citationThis article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.en
dc.identifier.citationIntern Med J. 2022 Jul 5. doi: 10.1111/imj.15865.en
dc.identifier.other101092952en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10137/12221en
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: There is sparse evidence in the literature in relation to indications and outcomes among adult Indigenous patients requiring a flexible bronchoscopy (FB). In this study, FB indications and outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous patients were assessed. METHODS: Self-reported Indigenous status, resident locality and the primary indication for FB were assessed. The FB procedures details, results of microbiology, cytology and histopathology were compared between Indigenous and non-Indigenous patients. Chest computed tomography (CT) was also analysed for its relationship to FB outcomes. RESULTS: Of the 403 patients, 111 (28%) were Indigenous and Indigenous patients were younger (mean difference 11 years) and higher proportion of remote residence (70% vs 13%). Malignancy (40%) and infection (31%) were the most common indications for FB, though Indigenous patients reported significantly more haemoptysis (15% vs 9%). No differences were noted in findings of the preceding chest CT scans. For positive microbiology, Indigenous patients had higher presence of S. Pneumoniae (30% vs 9%), while non-Indigenous patients had higher presence of P. Aeruginosa (43% vs 11%) and of mycobacteria (15% vs 4%). There were no significant difference between Indigenous and non-Indigenous patients for a positive histopathology, particularly for a diagnosis of lung malignancy (58% vs 54%). CONCLUSIONS: This study has demonstrated that adult Indigenous patients requiring a FB are significantly younger, tend to reside in remote communities and to demonstrate differing microbiology with no significant difference in the outcomes for lung malignancy. Ethnic status or remoteness should not preclude Indigenous patients to undergo a FB if clinically indicated. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.titleFlexible bronchoscopy indications and outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous patients in the Northern Territory of Australia.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen
dc.identifier.journaltitleInternal medicine journalen
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/imj.15865en
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0003-3674-5058en
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0003-0788-7137en
dc.identifier.pubmedurihttps://www.ezpdhcs.nt.gov.au/login?url=https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/35789046en
dc.description.affiliationDepartment of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia.en
dc.description.affiliationCollege of Health and Human Sciences, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia.en
dc.description.affiliationDarwin Respiratory and Sleep Health, Darwin Private Hospital, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia.en
dc.description.affiliationFlinders University, College of Medicine and Public Health, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.en
local.issue.number1445-5994 (Electronic)-
local.issue.number1444-0903 (Linking)-
Appears in Collections:(a) NT Health Research Collection

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