Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10137/11935
Title: Variations in clinical presentation and biomarkers amongst biopsy-proven Lupus Nephritis patients: a Top-End retrospective cohort study.
Authors: Xu, Chi
Clarke, Catherine
Goh, Kim Ling
Abeyaratne, Asanga
Mogulla, Manohar
Majoni, William
Priyadarshana, Kelum
Citation: This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Intern Med J. 2021 Oct 25. doi: 10.1111/imj.15596.
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Lupus nephritis (LN) is common feature of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) and affects 50% of patients with SLE. Racial differences in incidence and prevalence have been well documented worldwide. In Australia, higher incidence and prevalence of SLE had been previously reported in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Australians compared to non-Indigenous Australians. AIM: to describe the differences in clinical features and lupus biomarkers between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australian and non-Indigenous Australian LN patients. METHODS: We retrospectively identified all consecutive biopsy-proven LN patients in our institution and compared the clinical features and lupus biomarkers between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians and non-indigenous Australians. RESULTS: Of the thirty-three consecutive biopsy proven LN patients, twenty-six self-identified as of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander descent. The estimated incidence of lupus nephritis in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australian and non-Indigenous Australians were 5.08 and 0.47 per 100,000 patient years respectively. Neurological manifestations (23.08% vs 0%), haematological manifestations (46.50 % vs 16.67) and right heart catheter proven pulmonary arterial hypertension (23.08% vs 0%) were more frequently observed amongst Indigenous Australian patients compared to non-Indigenous Australian patients. The incidence of positive Extractable Nuclear Antigen (ENA) was also higher among Indigenous Australian patients (84.62% vs 57.14%). CONCLUSION: Our study further supports the observation that lupus in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians were of a 'distinct phenotype' compared to non-Indigenous Australians. Future research should be aimed at delineating the reason for this observed difference. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Click to open Pubmed Article: https://www.ezpdhcs.nt.gov.au/login?url=https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/34697868
Journal title: Internal medicine journal
Publication Date: 2021-10-25
Type: Journal Article
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10137/11935
DOI: 10.1111/imj.15596
Orcid: 0000-0003-3829-2187
Appears in Collections:(a) NT Health Research Collection

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