Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10137/11876
Title: The Mark Sheldon Remote Mental Health Team: an evaluation of patient demographics, diagnoses and clinical management in very remote Central Australia.
Authors: Brightman, Louise
O'Neill, Samantha
Gorey, Phyllis
Mitchell, David
Tabart, Marcus
Citation: Australas Psychiatry. 2021 Sep 6:10398562211038911. doi: 10.1177/10398562211038911.
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: The Mark Sheldon Remote Mental Health Team provides psychiatric services to 29 communities in very remote Central Australia. This study evaluated Mark Sheldon Remote Mental Health Team patient demographics, diagnoses and clinical management. METHODS: A retrospective cross-sectional review was performed for January 2020. Variables included age, sex, Indigenous status, diagnosis, legal status, medication class and route of administration. RESULTS: A total of 180 patients were identified (85.6% Indigenous, 53.3% male). Schizophrenia and delusional disorders were most common (41.1%). A small proportion of patients (2.8%) were involuntary. Psychotropic medication was commonly prescribed (77.4%) with a low threshold for anti-psychotic depot use (51.5%). Oral medication rates varied according to class. CONCLUSIONS: This study provided insights into the demographic and clinical profile of a unique population. The findings will help to optimise patient management in very remote Central Australia and serve as a foundation for similar evaluations and comparisons with other remote psychiatric services.
Click to open Pubmed Article: https://www.ezpdhcs.nt.gov.au/login?url=https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/34488492
Journal title: Australasian psychiatry : bulletin of Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists
Pages: 10398562211038911
Publication Date: 2021-09-06
Type: Journal Article
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10137/11876
DOI: 10.1177/10398562211038911
Orcid: 0000-0003-2007-0471
0000-0003-0470-362X
Appears in Collections:(a) NT Health Research Collection

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