Now showing 1 - 2 of 2
  • Publication
    Journal Article
    Supporting healthy lifestyles for First Nations women and communities through co-design: lessons and early findings from remote Northern Australia.
    (2024-05-28)
    Dias, Tara
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    Canuto, Karla
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    Boyle, Jacqueline A
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    D'Antoine, Heather
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    Hampton, Denella
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    Martin, Kim
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    Phillips, Jessica
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    Bartlett, Norlisha
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    Mcintyre, H David
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    Graham, Sian
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    McCarthy, Leisa
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    Kirkham, Renae
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    The period before, during, and after pregnancy presents an opportunity to reduce diabetes-related risks, which in Australia disproportionately impact Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women. Collaboration with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women/communities is essential to ensure acceptability and sustainability of lifestyle modifications. Using a novel co-design approach, we aimed to identify shared priorities and potential lifestyle strategies. We also reflected on learnings from this approach.We conducted 11 workshops and 8 interviews at two sites in Australia's Northern Territory (Central Australia and Top End), using experience-based co-design (EBCD) and incorporating principles of First Nations participatory research. Workshops/interviews explored participant' experiences and understanding of diabetes in pregnancy, contextual issues, and potential lifestyle strategies. Participants included three groups: 1) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women of reproductive age (defined as aged 16-45 years); 2) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community members; and 3) health/community services professionals. The study methodology sought to amplify the voices of Aboriginal women.Participants included 23 women between ages 16-45 years (9 with known lived experience of diabetes in pregnancy), 5 community members and 23 health professionals. Key findings related to identified priority issues, strategies to address priorities, and reflections on use of EBCD methodology. Priorities were largely consistent across study regions: access to healthy foods and physical activity; connection to traditional practices and culture; communication regarding diabetes and related risks; and the difficulty for women of prioritising their health among competing priorities. Strategies included implementation of a holistic women's program in Central Australia, while Top End participants expressed the desire to improve nutrition, peer support and community awareness of diabetes. EBCD provided a useful structure to explore participants' experiences and collectively determine priorities, while allowing for modifications to ensure co-design methods were contextually appropriate. Challenges included the resource-intensive nature of stakeholder engagement, and collaborating effectively with services and communities when researchers were "outsiders".A hybrid methodology using EBCD and First Nations participatory research principles enabled collaboration between Aboriginal women, communities and health services to identify shared priorities and solutions to reduce diabetes-related health risks. Genuine co-design processes support self-determination and enhance acceptability and sustainability of health strategies.
  • Publication
    Journal Article
    Codesigning enhanced models of care for Northern Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth with type 2 diabetes: study protocol.
    (2024-03-06)
    Kirkham, Renae
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    Puszka, Stefanie
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    Freeman, Natasha
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    Weaver, Emma
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    Morris, Jade
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    Mack, Shiree
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    O'Donnell, Vicki
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    Boffa, John
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    Graham, Sian
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    Scott, Lydia
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    Sinha, Ashim K
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    Shaw, Jonathan E
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    Azzopardi, Peter
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    Brown, Alex
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    Davis, Elizabeth
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    Wicklow, Brandy
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    Premature onset of type 2 diabetes and excess mortality are critical issues internationally, particularly in Indigenous populations. There is an urgent need for developmentally appropriate and culturally safe models of care. We describe the methods for the codesign, implementation and evaluation of enhanced models of care with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth living with type 2 diabetes across Northern Australia.Our mixed-methods approach is informed by the principles of codesign. Across eight sites in four regions, the project brings together the lived experience of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people (aged 10-25) with type 2 diabetes, their families and communities, and health professionals providing diabetes care through a structured yet flexible codesign process. Participants will help identify and collaborate in the development of a range of multifaceted improvements to current models of care. These may include addressing needs identified in our formative work such as the development of screening and management guidelines, referral pathways, peer support networks, diabetes information resources and training for health professionals in youth type 2 diabetes management. The codesign process will adopt a range of methods including qualitative interviews, focus group discussions, art-based methods and healthcare systems assessments. A developmental evaluation approach will be used to create and refine the components and principles of enhanced models of care. We anticipate that this codesign study will produce new theoretical insights and practice frameworks, resources and approaches for age-appropriate, culturally safe models of care.The study design was developed in collaboration with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous researchers, health professionals and health service managers and has received ethical approval across all sites. A range of outputs will be produced to disseminate findings to participants, other stakeholders and the scholarly community using creative and traditional formats.