Now showing 1 - 10 of 72
  • Publication
    Journal Article
    Arboviral diseases and malaria in Australia, 2013-14: Annual report of the National Arbovirus and Malaria Advisory Committee.
    (2016-09-30)
    Knope KE
    ;
    Muller M
    ;
    ;
    Doggett SL
    ;
    Feldman R
    ;
    Johansen CA
    ;
    Hobby M
    ;
    Bennett S
    ;
    Lynch S
    ;
    Sly A
    ;
    This report describes the epidemiology of mosquito-borne diseases of public health importance in Australia during the 2013-14 season (1 July 2013 to 30 June 2014) and includes data from human notifications, sentinel chicken, vector and virus surveillance programs. The National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System received notifications for 8,898 cases of disease transmitted by mosquitoes during the 2013-14 season. The Australasian alphaviruses Barmah Forest virus and Ross River virus accounted for 6,372 (72%) total notifications. However, over-diagnosis and possible false positive diagnostic test results for these 2 infections mean that the true burden of infection is likely overestimated, and as a consequence, the case definitions have been amended. There were 94 notifications of imported chikungunya virus infection and 13 cases of imported Zika virus infection. There were 212 notifications of dengue virus infection acquired in Australia and 1,795 cases acquired overseas, with an additional 14 cases for which the place of acquisition was unknown. Imported cases of dengue were most frequently acquired in Indonesia (51%). No cases of locally-acquired malaria were notified during the 2013-14 season, though there were 373 notifications of overseas-acquired malaria. In 2013-14, arbovirus and mosquito surveillance programs were conducted in most jurisdictions. Surveillance for exotic mosquitoes at international ports of entry continues to be a vital part of preventing the spread of vectors of mosquito-borne diseases such as dengue to new areas of Australia, with 13 detections of exotic mosquitoes at the ports of entry in 2013-14.
      1670
  • Publication
    Journal Article
    Incursion of Aedes aegypti in port areas of Darwin NT Australia, April and May 2013
    (Medical Entomology, DoH, 2013-12-04) ;
    Pettit WJ
    There were 2 exotic mosquito incursions detected at the Darwin port in the Northern Territory on the 23rd April and 3rd May 2013. In April, 5 adult Aedes aegypti were collected in a Biogents (BG) sentinel trap, and 1 adult Ae. aegypti was collected in a BG trap on 3rd May. Larvae and pupae were subsequently detected in a routine DAFF Biosecurity sentinel tyre trap on 14th May. The April incursion coincided with the berth of an international vessel at the international Toll Marine Logistics (TML) port facility, while the May incursion coincided with a vessel travelling on a national route between Cairns, Gove and Darwin. In response to both incursions, all receptacles in the TML port facility and adjacent premises were treated with residual insecticide and adult mosquito control (fogging) was carried out. Enhanced exotic mosquito surveillance was established as per protocol, to monitor for exotic mosquitoes over a period of 7 weeks. There have been no further detections of any adults or larvae Ae. aegypti at TML.
      2560  507
  • Publication
    Survey
    Jabiru and Cooinda exotic mosquito survey 20-21 March 2019
    (Department of Health, 2019-08-12) ;
    Medical entomology
    Due to Jabiru and Cooinda being popular tourist destination, there is a potential for the introduction of the dengue mosquito Aedes aegypti by road from north Queensland, where this mosquito is endemic. This could be via transport of live adult mosquitoes, but is most likely via transport of desiccation resistant eggs in receptacles. Therefore, Medical Entomology carries out an annual wet season survey of water-holding receptacles in residential and commercial areas in Jabiru. Carbon dioxide-baited BG sentinel traps are also set for exotic mosquito surveillance. This report outlines the activities and results from the mosquito surveys conducted on 20 and 21 March 2019
      1831  214
  • Publication
    Journal Article
    Determining meteorological drivers of salt marsh mosquito peaks in tropical northern Australia.
    (2015-12)
    Jacups SP
    ;
    Carter J
    ;
    ;
    McDonnell J
    ;
    Whelan PI
    In northern Australia the northern salt marsh mosquito Aedes vigilax is a vector of Ross River virus and is an appreciable pest. A coastal wetland adjacent to Darwin's residential suburbs offers a favorable habitat for Ae. vigilax, and despite vigilant mosquito control efforts, peaks of Ae. vigilax occur in excess of 500/trap/night some months. To improve mosquito control for disease and nuisance biting to nearby residential areas, we sought to investigate meteorological drivers associated with these Ae. vigilax peaks. We fitted a cross-sectional logistic regression model to weekly counts of female Ae. vigilax mosquitoes collected between July, 1998 and June, 2009 against variables, tide, rainfall, month, year, and larval control. Aedes vigilax peaks were associated with rainfall during the months September to November compared with January, when adjusted for larval control and tide. To maximize mosquito control efficiency, larval control should continue to be implemented after high tides and with increased emphasis on extensive larval hatches triggered by rainfall between September and November each year. This study reiterates the importance of monitoring and evaluating service delivery programs. Using statistical modelling, service providers can obtain solutions to operational problems using routinely collected data. These methods may be applicable in mosquito surveillance or control programs in other areas.
      1404
  • Publication
    Bulletin
    Mosquito control and the Katherine flood April 2006
    (Medical Entomology, DHCS, 2006-06)
    Whelan PI
    ;
    In January 1998 the town of Katherine, approximately 280 km south of Darwin, was extensively flooded. In the aftermath of the flood, the Medical Entomology Branch (MEB) of the Centre for Disease Control (CDC) in the Department of Health and Community Services (DHCS) carried out large-scale mosquito control operations, which reduced mosquito numbers and prevented an outbreak of mosquito borne disease.On 7 April 2006 Katherine was again flooded. Katherine has a seasonal risk of the mosquito borne disease, including Murray Valley encephalitis (MVE), which has a peak risk from March to June in the Top End. Mosquito monitoring in Katherine just before the flood showed relatively high numbers of Culex annulirostris, the main mosquito vector of MVE, which indicated that mosquito control was required urgently to prevent a possible outbreak of disease, as well as to prevent a major pest problem from mosquitoes.
      1326  294
  • Publication
    Journal Article
    Arboviral diseases and malaria in Australia, 2010-11: Annual report of the National Arbovirus and Malaria Advisory Committee
    (2013-03-01)
    Knope, Katrina
    ;
    Whelan, Peter
    ;
    Smith, David
    ;
    Nicholson, Jay
    ;
    Moran, Rod
    ;
    Doggett, Stephen
    ;
    Sly, Angus
    ;
    Hobby, Michaela
    ;
    ;
    Wright, Phil
    The National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS) received notification of 9,291 cases of disease transmitted by mosquitoes during the 2010-11 season (1 July 2010 to 30 June 2011). The alphaviruses Barmah Forest virus and Ross River virus accounted for 7,515 (81%) of these. There were 133 notifications of dengue virus infection acquired in Australia and 1,133 cases that were acquired overseas, while for 10 cases, the place of acquisition was unknown. The number of overseas acquired cases of dengue continues to rise each year, and these are most frequently acquired in Indonesia. Sentinel chicken, mosquito surveillance, viral detection in mosquitoes and climate modelling are used to provide early warning of arboviral disease activity in Australia. In early 2011, sentinel chickens in south eastern Australia widely seroconverted to flaviviruses. In 2010-11, there were 16 confirmed human cases of Murray Valley encephalitis acquired in Australia. There was one human case of Kunjin virus infection. There were 7 notifications of locally-acquired malaria in Australia and 407 notifications of overseasacquired malaria during the 2010-11 season.
      397
  • Publication
    Journal Article
    Arboviral diseases and malaria in Australia, 2012-13: Annual report of the National Arbovirus and Malaria Advisory Committee.
    (2016-03-31)
    Knope K E
    ;
    ;
    Doggett S L
    ;
    Muller M
    ;
    Johansen C A
    ;
    Feldman R
    ;
    Hobby M
    ;
    Bennett S
    ;
    Sly A
    ;
    Lynch S
    ;
    ;
    Nicholson J
    This report describes the epidemiology of mosquito-borne diseases of public health importance in Australia during the 2012-13 season (1 July 2012 to 30 June 2013) and includes data from human notifications, sentinel chicken, vector and virus surveillance programs. The National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System received notifications for 9,726 cases of disease transmitted by mosquitoes during the 2012-13 season. The Australasian alphaviruses Barmah Forest virus and Ross River virus accounted for 7,776 (80%) of total notifications. However, over-diagnosis and possible false positive diagnostic test results for these 2 infections mean that the true burden of infection is likely overestimated, and as a consequence, the case definitions were revised, effective from 1 January 2016. There were 96 notifications of imported chikungunya virus infection. There were 212 notifications of dengue virus infection acquired in Australia and 1,202 cases acquired overseas, with an additional 16 cases for which the place of acquisition was unknown. Imported cases of dengue were most frequently acquired in Indonesia. No locally-acquired malaria was notified during the 2012-13 season, though there were 415 notifications of overseas-acquired malaria. There were no cases of Murray Valley encephalitis virus infection in 2012-13. In 2012-13, arbovirus and mosquito surveillance programs were conducted in most jurisdictions with a risk of vectorborne disease transmission. Surveillance for exotic mosquitoes at the border continues to be a vital part of preventing the spread of mosquito-borne diseases such as dengue to new areas of Australia, and in 2012-13, there were 7 detections of exotic mosquitoes at the border.
      1457
  • Publication
    Report
    Medical Entomology Annual Reports
    (Top End Health Service, Northern Territory, 2021) ;
    Medical Entomology, Centre for Disease Control
      7393  1196
  • Publication
    Annual Report
    Medical Entomology Branch Report 2006-07
    (Medical Entomology, DHCS, 2008)
    Whelan PI
    ;
    ;
    Warchot A
    ;
    Carter JM
    ;
    Pettit WJ
    ;
    Nguyen HT
    ;
    Niscioli A
    ;
    Copley N
    ;
    Kulbac M
    ;
    Whitters RT
    ;
    Pearce T
    The Medical Entomology Annual Branch Report 2006-07 is intended to present an overall picture of mosquito surveillance and control activities carried out in the Northern Territory in 2006-07.
      1418  496
  • Publication
    Journal Article
    Environmental changes - a challenge for mosquito control in the Lee Point area, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia
    (Medical Entomology, DoH, 2015-12)
    Warchot A
    ;
    Copley N
    ;
    Lee Point, at the northern end of Casuarina Coastal Reserve in Darwin, Northern Territory, has historically been a productive breeding area for the northern salt marsh mosquito, Aedes vigilax. The main breeding habitats for this mosquito at Lee Point are coastal interdunal depressions. Sand deposition can form new mosquito breeding sites in the area, with the most recent site to the east of the tip of Lee Point found to be breeding mosquitoes in 2015. Coastal depressions at Lee Point usually breed Ae. vigilax after heavy wet season rainfall, with some sites also breeding after high tides during the wet season. However, the most recently formed interdunal depression was found to breed high numbers of Ae. vigilax larvae following a high tide in the late dry season, indicating the formation of the first dry season Ae. vigilax breeding site at Lee Point. Aedes vigilax is a major pest mosquito and can carry Ross River virus and Barmah Forest virus. This new area of mosquito breeding will be added to the routine larval mosquito control program for Casuarina Coastal Reserve. However, the new site and other interdunal depressions at Lee Point should be investigated for rectification to prevent mosquito breeding.
      2009  770