Now showing 1 - 2 of 2
  • Publication
    Journal Article
    Timing of tertiary trauma surveys during a time of increased trauma presentations - The Alice Springs Hospital Finke Desert Race experience.
    (2024-05-18)
    Laslett, Kirby
    ;
    Perry, Chris
    ;
    ;
    Coventry, Charles
    The Finke Desert Race is an offroad motorbike and buggy race held annually in central Australia. Owing to the treacherous conditions, this race sees a significant influx of trauma presentations to Alice Springs Hospital, the closest rural hospital. Completion of a tertiary trauma survey (TTS) within 24 hours of a patient's admission is part of standard trauma management.A retrospective analysis was undertaken of trauma presentations managed by general surgery over a 5-day period of the Finke Desert Race weekend, compared to a 3-month control period from February to April of the same year. To be included, patients met the criteria for completion of a TTS.The total number of trauma presentations over the 5-day period of the race weekend was 18 (an incidence rate of 3.6 cases/day), compared to a total of 31 in the 3-month control period (an incidence rate of 0.36 cases/day). The daily rate of major trauma presentations during the Finke race weekend was 9.9 times greater than during the control period. Completion of TTS was missed in only 5.6 % of patients over the Finke weekend, compared to 14.3 % of patients in the control period. The median time from presentation to the emergency department to completion of TTS during the Finke weekend was 20 h 19 min, compared to 20 h 36 min during the control period.Despite the substantial influx of trauma during the race weekend, fewer patients missed having a TTS completed compared to the control period. The median time taken to completion of TTS was similar between the two time periods. These findings suggest that the general surgery department was able to maintain standard trauma management principles.
  • Publication
    Journal Article
    Cholecystectomy in the red centre: a review of the surgical outcomes in Central Australia in a five-year period.
    (2024-04-28)
    Barbaro, Antonio
    ;
    Paredes, Steven Ronald
    ;
    Tran, Steven
    ;
    ;
    Arayne, Aisha Abdulmoeed
    ;
    Despite the high rates of cholecystectomy in Australia, there is minimal literature regarding the outcomes of cholecystectomy in rural Central Australia within the Northern Territory. This study aims to better characterize the outcomes for patients undergoing cholecystectomy in Central Australia and review clinical and patient characteristics, which may affect outcomes.A retrospective case-control study was performed using data obtained from medical records for all patients undergoing cholecystectomy at Alice Springs Hospital in the Northern Territory from January 2018 until December 2022. Patient characteristics were gathered, and key outcomes examined included: inpatient mortality and 30-day mortality, bile duct injury, bile leak, return to theatre, conversion to open, duration of procedure, length of stay, and up-transfer to a tertiary referral centre.A total of 466 patients were included in this study. Majority of the patients were female and there was a large portion of Indigenous Australians (56%). There were no inpatient mortalities, or 30-day mortalities recorded. There were two bile leaks and/or bile duct injuries (0.4%) and two unplanned returned to theatres (0.4%). Indigenous Australians were more likely to require an emergency operation and had a longer median length of stay (P < 0.001).Cholecystectomy can be performed safely and to a high standard in Central Australia. Surgeons in Central Australia must appreciate the nuances in the management of patients who come from a significantly different socioeconomic background, with complex medical conditions when compared to metropolitan centres.