Now showing 1 - 6 of 6
  • Publication
    Journal Article
    Exploring the appropriateness of prescribing practice of inhaled pharmacotherapy among Aboriginal Australians in the Top End Northern Territory of Australia: a retrospective cohort study.
    (2023-03-01)
    Heraganahally S
    ;
    Howarth TP
    ;
    Issac S
    ;
    Lloyd A
    ;
    Ravichandran SJ
    ;
    ;
    BACKGROUND: Aboriginal Australians are reported to have a high burden of chronic airway diseases. However, prescribing patterns and related outcomes of airway directed inhaled pharmacotherapy, (short-acting beta agonists (SABA), short-acting muscarinic antagonists (SAMA), long-acting β-agonists (LABA), long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMA) and inhaled corticosteroids (ICS)) among Aboriginal Australian patients with chronic airway disease have been sparsely reported in the past. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was conducted, using clinical, spirometry data, chest radiology, primary healthcare (PHC) presentations and hospital admission rates among Aboriginal patients identified to have been prescribed inhaled pharmacotherapy in remote and rural communities referred to the respiratory specialist service in the Top End, Northern Territory of Australia. RESULTS: Of the 372 identified active patients, 346 (93%) had inhaled pharmacotherapy prescribed (64% female, median age 57.7 years). ICS was the most common prescription (72% of the total cohort) and was recorded to be prescribed in 76% of patients with bronchiectasis, and 80% of patients with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Fifty-eight percent of patients had a respiratory hospital admission and 57% had a recorded PHC presentation for a respiratory issue during the study period, with a higher rate of hospital admissions among patients prescribed ICS compared with those on SAMA/SABA or LAMA/LABA without ICS (median rate (per person per year) 0.42 vs 0.21 and 0.21 (p=0.004). Regression models demonstrated that presence of COPD or bronchiectasis alongside ICS was associated with significantly increased hospitalisation rates (1.01 admissions/person/year (95% CI 0.15 to 1.87) and 0.71 admissions/person/year (95% CI 0.23 to 1.18) against patients without COPD/bronchiectasis, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that among Aboriginal patients with chronic airway diseases, ICS is the most common inhaled pharmacotherapy prescribed. Although LAMA/LABA and concurrent ICS use may be appropriate among patients with asthma and COPD, the use of ICS may have detrimental effects among those with underlying bronchiectasis either in isolation or concurrent COPD and bronchiectasis, potentially leading to higher hospital admission rates.
      3478
  • Publication
    Journal Article
    Opportunities for clinical decision support targeting medication safety in remote primary care management of chronic kidney disease: A qualitative study in Northern Australia.
    (2023-10-11)
    Tan MS
    ;
    ;
    Roughead EE
    ;
    Ward M
    ;
    Reuter SE
    ;
    Roberts G
    ;
    Andrade AQ
    INTRODUCTION: This study aimed to identify opportunities for clinical decision support targeting medication safety in remote primary care, by investigating the relationship between clinical workflows, health system priorities, cognitive tasks, and reasoning processes in the context of medicines used in people with chronic kidney disease (CKD). METHODS: This qualitative study involved one-on-one, semistructured interviews. The participants were healthcare professionals employed in a clinical or managerial capacity with clinical work experience in a remote health setting for at least 1 year. RESULTS: Twenty-five clinicians were interviewed. Of these, four were rural medical practitioners, nine were remote area nurses, eight were Aboriginal health practitioners, and four were pharmacists. Four major themes were identified from the interviews: (1) the need for a clinical decision support system to support a sustainable remote health workforce, as clinicians were "constantly stretched" and problems may "fall through the cracks"; (2) reliance on digital health technologies, as medical staff are often not physically available and clinicians-on-duty usually "flick an email and give a call so that I can actually talk it through to our GP"; (3) knowledge gaps, as "it takes a lot of mental space" to know each patient's renal function and their medication history, and clinicians believe "mistakes can be made"; and (4) multiple risk factors impacting CKD management, including clinical, social and behavioural determinants. CONCLUSIONS: The high prevalence of CKD and reliance on digital health systems in remote primary health settings can make a clinical decision support system valuable for supporting clinicians who may not have extensive experience in managing medicines for people with CKD.
      821
  • Publication
    Journal Article
    Antibiotic use for Australian Aboriginal children in three remote Northern Territory communities.
    (2020)
    Howarth T
    ;
    Brunette R
    ;
    Davies T
    ;
    Andrews RM
    ;
    ;
    Tong SYC
    ;
    Barzi F
    ;
    Kearns TM
    To describe antibiotic prescription rates for Australian Aboriginal children aged <2 years living in three remote Northern Territory communities. A retrospective cohort study using electronic health records. Three primary health care centres located in the Katherine East region. Consent was obtained from 149 mothers to extract data from 196 child records. There were 124 children born between January 2010 and July 2014 who resided in one of the three chosen communities and had electronic health records for their first two years of life. Antibiotic prescription rates, factors associated with antibiotic prescription and factors associated with appropriate antibiotic prescription. There were 5,675 Primary Health Care (PHC) encounters for 124 children (median 41, IQR 25.5, 64). Of the 5,675 PHC encounters, 1,542 (27%) recorded at least one infection (total 1,777) and 1,330 (23%) had at least one antibiotic prescription recorded (total 1,468). Children had a median five (IQR 2, 9) prescriptions in both their first and second year of life, with a prescription rate of 5.99/person year (95% CI 5.35, 6.63). Acute otitis media was the most common infection (683 records, 38%) and Amoxycillin was the most commonly prescribed antibiotic (797 prescriptions, 54%). Of the 1,468 recorded prescriptions, 398 (27%) had no infection recorded and 116 (8%) with an infection recorded were not aligned with local treatment guidelines. Prescription rates for Australian Aboriginal children in these communities are significantly higher than that reported nationally for non-Aboriginal Australians. Prescriptions predominantly aligned with treatment guidelines in this setting where there is a high burden of infectious disease.
      790
  • Publication
    Journal Article
      1042
  • Publication
    Journal Article
    Providing community-based health practitioners with timely and accurate discharge medicines information.
    (2012-12-10)
    Gilbert, Alice V
    ;
    ;
    Morrow, Melanie
    ;
    Williams, Desmond
    ;
    Roberts, Michael S
    ;
    Gilbert, Andrew L
    Accurate and timely medication information at the point of discharge is essential for continuity of care. There are scarce data on the clinical significance if poor quality medicines information is passed to the next episode of care. This study aimed to compare the number and clinical significance of medication errors and omission in discharge medicines information, and the timeliness of delivery of this information to community-based health practitioners, between the existing Hospital Discharge Summary (HDS) and a pharmacist prepared Medicines Information Transfer Fax (MITF). The study used a sample of 80 hospital patients who were at high risk of medication misadventure, and who had a MITF completed in the study period June - October 2009 at a tertiary referral hospital. The medicines information in participating patients' MITFs was validated against their Discharge Prescriptions (DP). Medicines information in each patient's HDS was then compared with their validated MITF. An expert clinical panel reviewed identified medication errors and omissions to determine their clinical significance. The time between patient discharge and the dispatching of the MITF and the HDS to each patient's community-based practitioners was calculated from hospital records. DPs for 77 of the 80 patients were available for comparison with their MITFs. Medicines information in 71 (92%) of the MITFs matched that of the DP. Comparison of the HDS against the MITF revealed that no HDS was prepared for 16 (21%) patients. Of the remaining 61 patients; 33 (54%), had required medications omitted and 38 (62%) had medication errors in their HDS. The Clinical Panel rated the significance of errors or omissions for 70 patients (16 with no HDS prepared and 54 who's HDS was inconsistent with the validated MITF). In 17 patients the error or omission was rated as insignificant to minor; 23 minor to moderate; 24 moderate to major and 6 major to catastrophic. 28 (35%) patients had their HDS dispatched to their community-based practitioners within 48 hours post discharge compared to 80 (100%) of MITFs. The MITF is an effective approach for the timely delivery of accurate discharge medicines information to community-based practitioners responsible for the patient's ongoing care.
      1084
  • Publication
    Journal Article
    Change in health outcomes for First Nations children with chronic wet cough: rationale and study protocol for a multi-centre implementation science study.
    (2022-12-29)
    Laird PJ
    ;
    Walker R
    ;
    McCallum G
    ;
    Toombs M
    ;
    Barwick M
    ;
    ;
    Aitken R
    ;
    Cooper M
    ;
    Norman R
    ;
    ;
    Lau G
    ;
    Chang AB
    ;
    Schultz A
    BACKGROUND: In children, chronic wet cough may be a sign of underlying lung disease, including protracted bacterial bronchitis (PBB) and bronchiectasis. Chronic (> 4 weeks in duration) wet cough (without indicators pointing to alternative causes) that responds to antibiotic treatment is diagnostic of PBB. Timely recognition and management of PBB can prevent disease progression to irreversible bronchiectasis with lifelong consequences. However, detection and management require timely health-seeking by carers and effective management by clinicians. We aim to improve (a) carer health-seeking for chronic wet cough in their child and (b) management of chronic wet cough in children by clinicians. We hypothesise that implementing a culturally integrated program, which is informed by barriers and facilitators identified by carers and health practitioners, will result in improved lung health of First Nations children, and in the future, a reduced the burden of bronchiectasis through the prevention of the progression of protracted bacterial bronchitis to bronchiectasis. METHODS: This study is a multi-centre, pseudorandomised, stepped wedge design. The intervention is the implementation of a program. The program has two components: a knowledge dissemination component and an implementation component. The implementation is adapted to each study site using a combined Aboriginal Participatory Action Research and an Implementation Science approach, guided by the Consolidated Framework of Implementation Research. There are three categories of outcome measures related to (i) health (ii) cost, and (iii) implementation. We will measure health-seeking as the proportion of parents seeking help for their child in a 6-month period before the intervention and the same 6-month period (i.e., the same six calendar months) thereafter. The parent-proxy, Cough-specific Quality of Life (PC-QoL) will be the primary health-related outcome measure. DISCUSSION: We hypothesise that a tailored intervention at each site will result in improved health-seeking for carers of children with a chronic wet cough and improved clinician management of chronic wet cough. In addition, we expect this will result in improved lung health outcomes for children with a chronic wet cough. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry; ACTRN12622000430730 , registered 16 March 2022, Retrospectively registered.
      3319