Now showing 1 - 2 of 2
  • Publication
    Journal Article
    A retrospective cohort study comparing outcomes following hip fractures in Australian indigenous patients with non-Australian indigenous patients.
    (2024-06-07)
    Cheok, Tim
    ;
    Bastick, Kate
    ;
    George, Daniel
    ;
    Chan, Teik Seng
    ;
    ;
    Jayasekera, Narlaka
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    ;
    Poonnoose, Pradeep Mathew
    ;
    Australian Indigenous (AI) populations face significant socioeconomic disadvantage and have poorer health outcomes when compared to their non-AI counterparts. There is a paucity of published literature on outcomes following hip fracture in the AI population.We performed a retrospective cohort study comparing outcomes following hip fracture in AI and non- AI patients presenting to a single regional trauma centre. The primary outcome of interest was all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes of interest were the odds of postoperative delirium and length of stay in hospital. All outcomes were adjusted against collected baseline covariates.One hundred and twenty-seven hip fractures were identified across 125 patients. There were 62 hip fractures in the AI group and 65 in the non-AI group. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for all-cause mortality was not statistically significant when comparing Indigenous versus non-Indigenous patients (HR = 2.37, P = 0.055). Adjusted odds of postoperative delirium was lower in Indigenous patients (OR = 0.12; P = 0.018). The AI cohort had a 4 day longer median length of stay, which was not statistically significant when adjusted for covariates.AI patients with hip fractures were younger, had a higher Charlson Comorbidity Index Score and American Society of Anaesthesiologists grade, as well as a higher incidence of diabetes and associated end-organ sequalae. There was no difference in all-cause mortality. Odds of postoperative delirium was lower in the AI group. We did not find any difference in the length of hospital stay.
  • Publication
    Journal Article
    The burden of Finke Desert race-related trauma: A 10-year retrospective descriptive analysis.
    The Finke Desert Race is an annual motorsport race (motorbikes, cars and buggies) held in Alice Springs resulting in a significant major trauma burden. This imposes unique challenges in one of the world's most remote healthcare settings. To quantify the volume and characteristics of Finke Desert Race-related trauma presenting to the Alice Springs Hospital. A retrospective descriptive study was undertaken to review all patients presenting to the Alice Springs Hospital with Finke Desert Race-related trauma over a 10-year period. Information collected included demographic data, injury characteristics, patient disposition and required management. Over the 9 years the event was held, 325 patients were admitted to the Alice Springs Hospital. Patients were almost exclusively male (98.8%), with a mean age of 34.75 and residing outside of Alice Springs (82.2%). There were a total of 460 distinct injuries with the clavicle, spine and ribs the three most commonly injured sites. A total of 129 operations were required, of which 19 required retrieval to an interstate centre. Alice Springs is one of the most remote and geographically isolated centres on Earth. This rurality poses unique challenges when trying to coordinate medical and retrieval services, exacerbated for a concentrated, yet highly resource intensive event such as Finke. It has far reaching impacts, placing additional stresses on all aspects of healthcare provision. This review has quantified the trauma burden of the event for the first time, enabling local and interstate stakeholders' ability to plan an adequate and sustainable response while also enabling the future effectiveness evaluation of recent safety reforms.
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