Now showing 1 - 3 of 3
  • Publication
    Journal Article
    An outbreak of acute rheumatic fever in a remote Aboriginal community.
    (2023-08-23)
    Egoroff N
    ;
    Bloomfield H
    ;
    Gondarra W
    ;
    Yambalpal B
    ;
    Guyula T
    ;
    Forward D
    ;
    Lyons G
    ;
    O'Connor E
    ;
    Sanderson L
    ;
    Dowden M
    ;
    ;
    de Dassel J
    ;
    ;
    Dhurrkay E R
    ;
    Gondarra V
    ;
    Holt D C
    ;
    ; ;
    Griffiths K
    ;
    Dempsey K
    ;
    Glynn-Robinson A
    OBJECTIVES: We describe the public health response to an outbreak of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) in a remote Aboriginal community. METHODS: In August 2021, the Northern Territory Rheumatic Heart Disease Control Program identified an outbreak of acute rheumatic fever in a remote Aboriginal community. A public health response was developed using a modified acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis protocol and the National Acute Rheumatic Fever Guideline for Public Health Units. RESULTS: 12 cases were diagnosed during the outbreak; six-times the average number of cases in the same period in the five years prior (n=1.8). Half (n=6) of the outbreak cases were classified as recurrent episodes with overdue secondary prophylaxis. Contact tracing and screening of 11 households identified 86 close contacts. CONCLUSIONS: This outbreak represented an increase in both first episodes and recurrences of acute rheumatic fever and highlights the critical need for strengthened delivery of acute rheumatic fever secondary prophylaxis, and for improvements to the social determinants of health in the region. IMPLICATIONS FOR PUBLIC HEALTH: Outbreaks of acute rheumatic fever are rare despite continuing high rates of acute rheumatic fever experienced by remote Aboriginal communities. Nevertheless, there can be improvements in the current national public health guidance relating to acute rheumatic fever cluster and outbreak management.
      2828
  • Publication
    Journal Article
    An omega 3 fatty acid supplemented diet was not associated with enhanced survival in maintenance haemodialysis: The fish and fruit study
    (2020-07-01)
    Barzi F
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    ;
    Singh G
    ;
    Lawton PD
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    ;
    Jose M
    ;
    Snelling P
    ;
    Hall H
    ;
    Cass A
    ;
    O'Dea K
    Background: Aboriginal people requiring haemodialysis experience high cardiovascular mortality. Dietary interventions have uncertain effects on mortality and cardiovascular events in people with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). Aim: To determine if a dietary intervention of fish and fruit would decrease all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in Aboriginal people requiring haemodialysis. Methods: A randomised dietary intervention of 300gm fish and five portions of fruit spaced over three dialysis treatments per week versus usual renal diet. Blood concentrations of omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA and n-6 PUFA respectively) were recorded over a 12-month period. Results: The mean age of the 151 randomised patients was 53 years; 42% were males, 94% of Aboriginal people and 74% with diabetes. There was no significant difference in n-3 PUFA concentration over the follow-up. The cardiovascular mortality rate was not different between the intervention and control group assessed at 2.1 years followup (3.7 v 4.3%, p=0.92), or at 5.0 years follow-up (19.7% v 21.8%, p=0.93). Conclusions: The 12-month diet intervention including fish and fruit meal supplementation did not provide a survival advantage in patients with very low baseline n-3:n-6 PUFA ratio.
      470
  • Publication
    Fact Sheet
    Smoking Prevalence Northern Territory – 1994 TO 2013
    (Health Gains Planning, 2014-04) ; ;
    Guthridge, Steve
    ;
    Innovation and Research
    This fact sheet provides a summary of trends in smoking prevalence in the NT from 1994 - 2014 and importantly estimates the general NT smoking prevalence, which is not available from any single source.
      14096  2616