NT Health Research and Publications Online

Welcome to NT Health Research and Publications Online, an open access digital repository that showcases the research projects and output of researchers working for the Northern Territory Department of Health (NT Health), while also collecting and preserving publications and multimedia produced in an official capacity, that represent the department. This service is maintained by NT Health Library Services
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477
Projects
9
People
26
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  • Organizational Unit
    NT Health
  • Publication
    Journal Article
    Timing of tertiary trauma surveys during a time of increased trauma presentations - The Alice Springs Hospital Finke Desert Race experience.
    (2024-05-18)
    Laslett, Kirby
    ;
    Perry, Chris
    ;
    ;
    Coventry, Charles
    The Finke Desert Race is an offroad motorbike and buggy race held annually in central Australia. Owing to the treacherous conditions, this race sees a significant influx of trauma presentations to Alice Springs Hospital, the closest rural hospital. Completion of a tertiary trauma survey (TTS) within 24 hours of a patient's admission is part of standard trauma management.A retrospective analysis was undertaken of trauma presentations managed by general surgery over a 5-day period of the Finke Desert Race weekend, compared to a 3-month control period from February to April of the same year. To be included, patients met the criteria for completion of a TTS.The total number of trauma presentations over the 5-day period of the race weekend was 18 (an incidence rate of 3.6 cases/day), compared to a total of 31 in the 3-month control period (an incidence rate of 0.36 cases/day). The daily rate of major trauma presentations during the Finke race weekend was 9.9 times greater than during the control period. Completion of TTS was missed in only 5.6 % of patients over the Finke weekend, compared to 14.3 % of patients in the control period. The median time from presentation to the emergency department to completion of TTS during the Finke weekend was 20 h 19 min, compared to 20 h 36 min during the control period.Despite the substantial influx of trauma during the race weekend, fewer patients missed having a TTS completed compared to the control period. The median time taken to completion of TTS was similar between the two time periods. These findings suggest that the general surgery department was able to maintain standard trauma management principles.
  • Publication
    Journal Article
    Twenty-four Month Outcomes of Extended- Versus Standard-course Antibiotic Therapy in Children Hospitalized With Pneumonia in High-Risk Settings: A Randomized Controlled Trial.
    (2024-06-03)
    Kok, Hing C
    ;
    McCallum, Gabrielle B
    ;
    Yerkovich, Stephanie T
    ;
    Grimwood, Keith
    ;
    Fong, Siew M
    ;
    Nathan, Anna M
    ;
    Byrnes, Catherine A
    ;
    Ware, Robert S
    ;
    Nachiappan, Nachal
    ;
    Saari, Noorazlina
    ;
    ;
    Yeo, Tsin W
    ;
    Oguoma, Victor M
    ;
    Masters, I Brent
    ;
    de Bruyne, Jessie A
    ;
    Eg, Kah P
    ;
    Lee, Bilawara
    ;
    Ooi, Mong H
    ;
    Upham, John W
    ;
    Torzillo, Paul J
    ;
    Chang, Anne B
    Pediatric community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) can lead to long-term respiratory sequelae, including bronchiectasis. We determined if an extended (13-14 days) versus standard (5-6 days) antibiotic course improves long-term outcomes in children hospitalized with CAP from populations at high risk of chronic respiratory disease.We undertook a multicenter, double-blind, superiority, randomized controlled trial involving 7 Australian, New Zealand, and Malaysian hospitals. Children aged 3 months to ≤5 years hospitalized with radiographic-confirmed CAP who received 1-3 days of intravenous antibiotics, then 3 days of oral amoxicillin-clavulanate, were randomized to either extended-course (8-day oral amoxicillin-clavulanate) or standard-course (8-day oral placebo) arms. Children were reviewed at 12 and 24 months. The primary outcome was children with the composite endpoint of chronic respiratory symptoms/signs (chronic cough at 12 and 24 months; ≥1 subsequent hospitalized acute lower respiratory infection by 24 months; or persistent and/or new chest radiographic signs at 12-months) at 24-months postdischarge, analyzed by intention-to-treat, where children with incomplete follow-up were assumed to have chronic respiratory symptoms/signs ("worst-case" scenario).A total of 324 children were randomized [extended-course (n = 163), standard-course (n = 161)]. For our primary outcome, chronic respiratory symptoms/signs occurred in 97/163 (60%) and 94/161 (58%) children in the extended-courses and standard-courses, respectively [relative risk (RR) = 1.02, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.85-1.22]. Among children where all sub-composite outcomes were known, chronic respiratory symptoms/signs between groups, RR = 1.10, 95% CI: 0.69-1.76 [extended-course = 27/93 (29%) and standard-course = 24/91 (26%)]. Additional sensitivity analyses also revealed no between-group differences.Among children from high-risk populations hospitalized with CAP, 13-14 days of antibiotics (versus 5-6 days), did not improve long-term respiratory outcomes.
  • Publication
    Journal Article
    Hearing loss in Australian First Nations children at 6-monthly assessments from age 12 to 36 months: Secondary outcomes from randomised controlled trials of novel pneumococcal conjugate vaccine schedules.
    (2024-06-03)
    Leach, Amanda Jane
    ;
    Wilson, Nicole
    ;
    Arrowsmith, Beth
    ;
    Beissbarth, Jemima
    ;
    Mulholland, Kim
    ;
    Santosham, Mathuram
    ;
    Torzillo, Paul John
    ;
    McIntyre, Peter
    ;
    Smith-Vaughan, Heidi
    ;
    Skull, Sue A
    ;
    Oguoma, Victor M
    ;
    Chatfield, Mark D
    ;
    Lehmann, Deborah
    ;
    Brennan-Jones, Christopher G
    ;
    Binks, Michael J
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    Licciardi, Paul V
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    Andrews, Ross M
    ;
    Snelling, Tom
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    Carapetis, Jonathan
    ;
    ;
    Chang, Anne B
    ;
    In Australian remote communities, First Nations children with otitis media (OM)-related hearing loss are disproportionately at risk of developmental delay and poor school performance, compared to those with normal hearing. Our objective was to compare OM-related hearing loss in children randomised to one of 2 pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) formulations.In 2 sequential parallel, open-label, randomised controlled trials (the PREVIX trials), eligible infants were first allocated 1:1:1 at age 28 to 38 days to standard or mixed PCV schedules, then at age 12 months to PCV13 (13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, +P) or PHiD-CV10 (10-valent pneumococcal Haemophilus influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine, +S) (1:1). Here, we report prevalence and level of hearing loss outcomes in the +P and +S groups at 6-monthly scheduled assessments from age 12 to 36 months. From March 2013 to September 2018, 261 infants were enrolled and 461 hearing assessments were performed. Prevalence of hearing loss was 78% (25/32) in the +P group and 71% (20/28) in the +S group at baseline, declining to 52% (28/54) in the +P groups and 56% (33/59) in the +S group at age 36 months. At primary endpoint age 18 months, prevalence of moderate (disabling) hearing loss was 21% (9/42) in the +P group and 41% (20/49) in the +S group (difference -19%; (95% confidence interval (CI) [-38, -1], p = 0.07) and prevalence of no hearing loss was 36% (15/42) in the +P group and 16% (8/49) in the +S group (difference 19%; (95% CI [2, 37], p = 0.05). At subsequent time points, prevalence of moderate hearing loss remained lower in the +P group: differences -3%; (95% CI [-23, 18], p = 1.00 at age 24 months), -12%; (95% CI [-30, 6], p = 0.29 at age 30 months), and -9%; (95% CI [-23, 5], p = 0.25 at age 36 months). A major limitation was the small sample size, hence low power to reach statistical significance, thereby reducing confidence in the effect size.In this study, we observed a high prevalence and persistence of moderate (disabling) hearing loss throughout early childhood. We found a lower prevalence of moderate hearing loss and correspondingly higher prevalence of no hearing loss in the +P group, which may have substantial benefits for high-risk children, their families, and society, but warrant further investigation.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01735084 and NCT01174849.
  • Publication
    Report
    Northern Territory Market Basket Survey 2023
    (NT Health, 2024-05)
    NT Health
    The Market Basket Survey (MBS) reports the cost, availability and quality of basic food items in the Northern Territory’s remote stores. The 2023 survey is the 21st survey of this series.
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  • Publication
    Report
    Application to register radiation source
    (Department of Health, 2020)
    Department of Health
    ;
    Environmental Health
  • Publication
    Journal Article
    10-Valent pneumococcal non-typeable H. influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV10) versus 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) as a booster dose to broaden and strengthen protection from otitis media (PREVIX_BOOST) in Australian Aboriginal children: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.
    (2020-05-24)
    Oguoma VM
    ;
    Wilson N
    ;
    Mulholland K
    ;
    Santosham M
    ;
    Torzillo P
    ;
    McIntyre P
    ;
    Smith-Vaughan H
    ;
    Balloch A
    ;
    Chatfield M
    ;
    Lehmann D
    ;
    Binks MJ
    ;
    ;
    Carapetis JR
    ;
    ;
    Andrews RM
    ;
    Snelling T
    ;
    Licciardi P
    ;
    ;
    Leach AJ
    INTRODUCTION: Streptococcus pneumoniae and non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) are major otitis media pathogens that densely co-colonise the nasopharynx and infect the middle ear of Australian Aboriginal infants from very early in life. Our co-primary hypotheses are that at 18 months of age infants receiving 10-valent pneumococcal Haemophilus influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV10) compared with those receiving 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) as a booster at 12 months of age will have higher antibody levels to Haemophilus influenzae protein D and that infants receiving PCV13 will have higher antibody levels to PCV13-only serotypes 3, 6A and 19A. METHODS AND ANALYSES: Our randomised controlled trial will enrol 270 Aboriginal children at 12 months of age to a booster dose of either PHiD-CV10 or PCV13. Children who completed the three-dose primary course schedules of PHiD-CV10 at 2, 4, 6 months of age; PCV13 at 2, 4, 6 months of age; or a combination schedule of PHiD-CV10 at 1, 2, 4 months of age plus PCV13 at 6 months of age are eligible. The co-primary assessor-blinded outcomes when the infants are 18 months of age are as follows: (a) IgG geometric mean concentration (GMC) and proportion with IgG ≥100 EU/mL for protein D, and (b) IgG GMC and the proportion with IgG ≥0.35 µg/mL for pneumococcal serotypes 3, 6A and 19A. Secondary immunogenicity comparisons of six primary and booster dose schedules of 10 shared serotypes at 18 months of age, nasopharyngeal carriage, all forms of otitis media, hearing loss and developmental milestones at 18, 24, 30 and 36 months of age will be reported. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethics committees of NT Department of Health, Menzies, WA Department of Health and WA Aboriginal Health approved the study. Results will be presented to communities, at conferences and published in peer-reviewed journals. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT01735084.
  • Publication
    Report
    1997 Commonwealth-State Disability Agreement Survey Report
    (Territory Health Services, 1997)
    Pearce, Michael
    ;
    Epidemiology and Statistics Branch Territory Health Services
    As part of the Commonwealth-State Disability Agreement (CSDA), the Commonwealth, State and Territory governments agreed to provide each other with information about disability programmes and consumers of disability services. This information is to be used for planning purposes, national programme evaluation and to monitor achievement of programme objectives and agreed priorities. Accordingly, a Minimum Data Set (MDS) has been developed by a Commonwealth-State committee with the assistance of the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW).
  • Publication
    Plan
    Northern Territory Health Strategic Plan 2018-2022
    (Department of Health, 2018-04-06)
    Chief Executive Officer
    The Northern Territory (NT) Strategic Plan 2018-2022. This Plan sets out the direction of the public healthcare system in the NT. It has as its starting point our vision of striving to become a world leader in the delivery of remote health.
  • Publication
    Report
    Northern Territory Midwives Collection Mothers and Babies 2003
    (Department of Health and Families, 2003)
    Zhang X
    ;
    Dempsey K
    ;
    ;
    Innovation and Research
    This report summarises data from the 2003 Northern Territory (NT) Midwives Collection. It includes population characteristics of mothers, maternal health status, antenatal information, conditions and procedures used in labour and childbirth as well as birth outcomes of all births that occurred in 2003. While the NT Midwives’ Collection contains information on both NT resident and interstate residents who gave birth in the NT, the focus of this report is NT residents who gave birth in the NT. Notes and Corrections: On 24 October 2011 an error was observed in table 32. There has been an update to the introduction and to Table 32. An amended version of the document and the previous version are presented below