NT Health Research and Publications Online

Welcome to NT Health Research and Publications Online, an open access digital repository that showcases the research projects and output of researchers working for the Northern Territory Department of Health (NT Health), while also collecting and preserving publications and multimedia produced in an official capacity, that represent the department. This service is maintained by NT Health Library Services
All Publications
4224
Projects
61
People
244
Recent Additions
  • Person
    Wilson, Dan
  • Publication
    Policy
    Type 2 Diabetes in young Aboriginal people clinical policy
    (NT Health, 2024-05-31)
    NT Health
    NT Health, through its Diabetes Network, is committed to a whole-system-approach to improving prevention, early detection and management of type 2 diabetes in Aboriginal young people (youth diabetes) in the Northern Territory (NT). Evidence-based screening and management pathways for Aboriginal youth who are at risk of and/or living with diabetes, can significantly reduce the risk of serious health complications. Well-structured prevention and management of youth diabetes will significantly improve quality of life. Throughout this policy the term Aboriginal should be taken to include Torres Strait Islander people.
  • Publication
    Journal Article
    Approach to melioidosis
    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, is endemic in tropical and subtropical regions where it is a cause of community-acquired sepsis. Much of the global burden is in the Asia-Pacific region, however melioidosis remains under-reported and the known area of endemicity has expanded to include countries in Africa and the Americas, including the Southern USA. Infection is via environmental exposure to soil and water, and may occur via (sometimes minor) skin trauma, inhalation during severe weather, or ingestion of untreated water. Those with diabetes, hazardous alcohol consumption, chronic kidney disease, and other immune suppression are most at risk. The clinical manifestations are protean, and include pneumonia, abscesses of internal organs, non-healing ulcers, bone and joint infection, and encephalomyelitis. Diagnosis is made when B. pseudomallei is isolated from clinical specimens. Over half of patients have positive blood cultures. To prevent relapse, prolonged therapy is needed; this includes at least 10-14 days of intravenous ceftazidime, meropenem, or imipenem, and at least 3 months of oral trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. There is no licensed vaccine available, however phase 1 clinical trials of vaccine candidates will soon commence.
  • Publication
    Conference paper
    Health workforce turnover, stability and employment survival in remote NT health centres 2004-2015
    (2019-03-24)
    Russell, Deborah
    ;
    ; ;
    Guthridge, Steven
    ;
    ;
    Jones, Mike
    ;
    Humphreys, John
    ;
    Wakerman, John
    Delivering effective primary care to where it’s needed most – specifically remote Aboriginal communities – is hampered by high turnover and low stability of health centre staff and a lack of evidence about this to inform remote workforce policy making. This research describes the turnover, stability and employment survival patterns over 12 years in remote Northern Territory (NT) health centres
  • Publication
    Journal Article
    The relationship between number of primary health care visits and hospitalisations: evidence from linked clinic and hospital data for remote Indigenous Australians.
    (2013-11-06) ; ;
    Guthridge, Steven
    ;
    Lawton, P
    Primary health care (PHC) is widely regarded as essential for preventing and treating ill health. However, the evidence on whether improved PHC reduces hospitalisations has been mixed. This study examines the relationship between PHC and hospital inpatient care in a population with high health need, high rates of hospitalisation and relatively poor PHC access.The cross-sectional study used linked individual level PHC visit and hospitalisation data for 52 739 Indigenous residents from 54 remote communities in the Northern Territory of Australia between 1 July 2007 and 30 June 2011. The association between PHC visits and hospitalisations was modelled using simple and spline quadratic regression for key demographics and disease groups including potentially avoidable hospitalisations.At the aggregate level, the average annual number of PHC visits per person had a U-shaped association with hospitalisations. For all conditions combined, there was an inverse association between PHC visits and hospitalisations for people with less than four clinic visits per year, but a positive association for those visiting the clinic four times or more. For patients with diabetes, ischaemic heart disease or renal disease, the minimum level of hospitalisation was found when there was 20-30 PHC visits a year, and for children with otitis media and dental conditions, 5-8 visits a year.The results of this study demonstrate a U-shape relationship between PHC visits and hospitalisations. Under the conditions of remote Indigenous Australians, there may be an optimal level of PHC at which hospitalisations are at a minimum. The authors propose that the effectiveness of a health system may hinge on a refined balance, rather than a straight-line relationship between primary health care and tertiary care.
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