NT Health Research and Publications Online

Welcome to NT Health Research and Publications Online, an open access digital repository that showcases the research projects and output of researchers working for the Northern Territory Department of Health (NT Health), while also collecting and preserving publications and multimedia produced in an official capacity, that represent the department. This service is maintained by NT Health Library Services
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  • Publication
    Journal Article
    Impact on pregnancy outcomes of intermittent preventive treatment with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine in urban and peri-urban Papua New Guinea: a retrospective cohort study.
    (2024-07-05)
    Cellich, Philip
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    Rogerson, Stephen J
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    Mola, Glen D L
    Intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (IPTp-SP) reduces malaria-attributable adverse pregnancy outcomes and may also prevent low birth weight (< 2,500 g) through mechanisms independent of malaria. Malaria transmission in Papua New Guinea (PNG) is highly heterogeneous. The impact of IPTp-SP on adverse birth outcomes in settings with little or no malaria transmission, such as PNG's capital city Port Moresby, is unknown.A retrospective cohort study was conducted amongst HIV-negative women with a singleton pregnancy who delivered at Port Moresby General Hospital between 18 July and 21 August 2022. The impact of IPTp-SP doses on adverse birth outcomes and anaemia was assessed using logistic and linear regression models, as appropriate.Of 1,140 eligible women amongst 1,228 consecutive births, 1,110 had a live birth with a documented birth weight. A total of 156 women (13.7%) did not receive any IPTp-SP, 347 women (30.4%) received one, 333 (29.2%) received two, and 304 (26.7%) received the recommended ≥ 3 doses of IPTp-SP. A total of 65 of 1,110 liveborn babies (5.9%) had low birth weight and there were 34 perinatal deaths (3.0%). Anaemia (haemoglobin < 100 g/L) was observed in 30.6% (243/793) of women, and 14 (1.2%) had clinical malaria in pregnancy. Compared to women receiving 0-1 dose of IPTp-SP, women receiving ≥ 2 doses had lower odds of LBW (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.50; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.26, 0.96), preterm birth (aOR 0.58; 95% CI 0.32, 1.04), perinatal death (aOR 0.49; 95% CI 0.18, 1.38), LBW/perinatal death (aOR 0.55; 95% CI 0.27, 1.12), and anaemia (OR 0.50; 95% CI 0.36, 0.69). Women who received 2 doses versus 0-1 had 45% lower odds of LBW (aOR 0.55, 95% CI 0.27, 1.10), and a 16% further (total 61%) reduction with ≥ 3 doses (aOR 0.39, 95% CI 0.14, 1.05). Birth weights for women who received 2 or ≥ 3 doses versus 0-1 were 81 g (95% CI -3, 166) higher, and 151 g (58, 246) higher, respectively.Provision of IPTp-SP in a low malaria-transmission setting in PNG appears to translate into substantial health benefits, in a dose-response manner, supporting the strengthening IPTp-SP uptake across all transmission settings in PNG.
  • Publication
    Journal Article
    Benchmarking for healthy food stores: protocol for a randomised controlled trial with remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in Australia to enhance adoption of health-enabling store policy and practice.
    (2024-07-05)
    Brimblecombe, Julie
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    Ferguson, Megan
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    McMahon, Emma
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    Fredericks, Bronwyn
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    Turner, Nicole
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    Pollard, Christina
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    Batstone, Joanna
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    McCarthy, Leisa
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    Miles, Eddie
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    De Silva, Khia
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    Chatfield, Mark
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    Hill, Amanda
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    Christian, Meaghan
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    van Burgel, Emma
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    Fairweather, Molly
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    Murison, Anna
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    Lukose, Dickson
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    Gaikwad, Surekha
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    Lewis, Meron
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    Clancy, Rebekah
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    Uhlmann, Kora
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    Funston, Sarah
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    Baddeley, Laura
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    Tsekouras, Sally
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    Ananthapavan, Jaithri
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    Sacks, Gary
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    Lee, Amanda
    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in remote Australia have initiated bold policies for health-enabling stores. Benchmarking, a data-driven and facilitated 'audit and feedback' with action planning process, provides a potential strategy to strengthen and scale health-enabling best-practice adoption by remote community store directors/owners. We aim to co-design a benchmarking model with five partner organisations and test its effectiveness with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community stores in remote Australia.Study design is a pragmatic randomised controlled trial with consenting eligible stores (located in very remote Northern Territory (NT) of Australia, primary grocery store for an Aboriginal community, and serviced by a Nutrition Practitioner with a study partner organisation). The Benchmarking model is informed by research evidence, purpose-built best-practice audit and feedback tools, and co-designed with partner organisation and community representatives. The intervention comprises two full benchmarking cycles (one per year, 2022/23 and 2023/24) of assessment, feedback, action planning and action implementation. Assessment of stores includes i adoption status of 21 evidence-and industry-informed health-enabling policies for remote stores, ii implementation of health-enabling best-practice using a purpose-built Store Scout App, iii price of a standardised healthy diet using the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Healthy Diets ASAP protocol; and, iv healthiness of food purchasing using sales data indicators. Partner organisations feedback reports and co-design action plans with stores. Control stores receive assessments and continue with usual retail practice. All stores provide weekly electronic sales data to assess the primary outcome, change in free sugars (g) to energy (MJ) from all food and drinks purchased, baseline (July-December 2021) vs July-December 2023.We hypothesise that the benchmarking intervention can improve the adoption of health-enabling store policy and practice and reduce sales of unhealthy foods and drinks in remote community stores of Australia. This innovative research with remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities can inform effective implementation strategies for healthy food retail more broadly.ACTRN12622000596707, Protocol version 1.
  • Person
    Barnes, Adam
  • Organizational Unit
  • Person
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