NT Health Research and Publications Online

Welcome to NT Health Research and Publications Online, an open access digital repository that showcases the research projects and output of researchers working for the Northern Territory Department of Health (NT Health), while also collecting and preserving publications and multimedia produced in an official capacity, that represent the department. This service is maintained by NT Health Library Services
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4195
Projects
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216
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  • Publication
    Journal Article
    Financial incentives to motivate treatment for hepatitis C with direct acting antivirals among Australian adults (The Methodical evaluation and Optimisation of Targeted IncentiVes for Accessing Treatment of Early-stage hepatitis C: MOTIVATE-C): protocol for a dose-response randomised controlled study.
    (2024-06-16T14:00:00Z)
    Fathima, Parveen
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    Jones, Mark
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    D'Souza, Reena
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    Totterdell, James
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    Andric, Nada
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    Abbott, Penelope
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    Norman, Richard
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    Howard, Kirsten
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    Cheng, Wendy
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    Pedrana, Alisa
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    Doyle, Joseph S
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    Snelling, Thomas
    Untreated hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can result in cirrhosis and hepatocellular cancer. Direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapies are highly effective and have few side effects compared to older interferon-based therapy. Despite the Australian government providing subsidised and unrestricted access to DAA therapy for chronic HCV infection, uptake has not been sufficient to meet the global target of eliminating HCV as a public health threat by 2030. This study will offer people with HCV financial incentives of varying values in order to evaluate its effect on initiation of DAA therapy in primary care.Australian adults (18 years or older) who self-report as having current untreated HCV infection can register to participate via an automated SMS-based system. Following self-screening for eligibility, registrants are offered a financial incentive of randomised value (AUD 0 to 1000) to initiate DAA therapy. Study treatment navigators contact registrants who have consented to be contacted, to complete eligibility assessment, outline the study procedures (including the requirement for participants to consult a primary care provider), obtain consent, and finalise enrolment. Enrolled participants receive their offered incentive on provision of evidence of DAA therapy initiation within 12 weeks of registration (primary endpoint). Balanced randomisation is used across the incentive range until the first analysis, after which response-adaptive randomisation will be used to update the assignment probabilities. For the primary analysis, a Bayesian 4-parameter EMAX model will be used to estimate the dose-response curve and contrast treatment initiation at each incentive value against the control arm (AUD 0). Specified secondary statistical and economic analyses will evaluate the effect of incentives on adherence to DAA therapy, virological response, and cost-effectiveness.This project seeks to gain an understanding of the dose-response relationship between incentive value and DAA treatment initiation, while maximising the number of people treated for HCV within fixed budget and time constraints. In doing so, we hope to offer policy-relevant recommendation(s) for the use of financial incentives as a pragmatic, efficient, and cost-effective approach to achieving elimination of HCV from Australia.ANZCTR (anzctr.org.au), Identifier ACTRN12623000024640, Registered 11 January 2023 ( https://anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=384923&isReview=true ).
  • Publication
    Journal Article
    Childhood Cancer Incidence and Survival in South Australia and the Northern Territory, 1990-2017, with Emphasis on Indigenous Peoples.
    (2024-05-29)
    Mashtoub, Suzanne
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    Ullah, Shahid
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    Singh, Gurmeet R
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    Clark Adnyamathanha, Justine
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    Leemaqz, Shalem
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    Paltiel, Ora
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    Roder, David M
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    Saxon, Benjamin
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    McKinnon, Ross
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    Pandol, Stephen J
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    Roberts, Claire T
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    Barreto, Savio George
    Reports of a rise in childhood cancer incidence in Australia and globally prompted the investigation of cancer incidence and survival in South Australia (SA) and the Northern Territory (NT) over a 28-year period, with emphasis on Indigenous peoples.This cross-sectional analysis of two prospective longitudinal databases, the SA and NT Cancer Registries (1990-2017), included all reported cases of childhood cancers. Poisson regression provided estimates of incidence rate ratios and survival was modelled using Cox proportional hazard models for children aged <5 and ≥5 years.A total of 895 patients across SA ( = 753) and the NT ( = 142) were ascertained. Overall and in the NT, childhood cancer incidence was higher in males compared with females (IRR 1.19 [1.04-1.35] and 1.43 [1.02-2.01], respectively). Lymphocytic leukemia was the most reported cancer type across all locations. With reference to the 1990-1999 era (181.67/100,000), cancer incidence remained unchanged across subsequent eras in the combined cohort (SA and NT) (2000-2009: 190.55/100,000; 1.06 [0.91-1.25]; 2010-2017: 210.00/100,000; 1.15 [0.98-1.35]); similar outcomes were reflected in SA and NT cohorts. Cancer incidence amongst non-Indigenous children significantly decreased from the 1990-1999 era (278.32/100,000) to the 2000-2009 era (162.92/100,000; 0.58 [0.35-0.97]). Amongst 39 Indigenous children in the NT, incidence rates remained unchanged across eras ( > 0.05). With reference to the 1990-1999 era, overall survival improved in subsequent eras in SA (2000-2009: HR 0.53 [0.38-0.73]; 2010-2017: 0.44 [0.28-0.68]); however, remained unchanged in the NT (2000-2009: 0.78 [0.40-1.51]; 2010-2017: 0.50 [0.24-1.05]). In the NT, overall survival of Indigenous patients was significantly lower compared with the non-Indigenous cohort (3.42 [1.92-6.10]). While the survival of Indigenous children with cancer significantly improved in the last two eras ( < 0.05), compared to the 1990-1999 era, no change was noted amongst non-Indigenous children in the NT ( > 0.05).The incidence of childhood cancers has remained unchanged over 28-years in SA and the NT. Encouragingly, improved survival rates over time were observed in SA and amongst Indigenous children of the NT. Nevertheless, survival rates in Indigenous children remain lower than non-Indigenous children.
  • Person
  • Publication
    Journal Article
    Marginal zone lymphomas: a consensus practice statement from the Australasian Lymphoma Alliance.
    (2024-06-01)
    Lasica, Masa
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    Anderson, Mary A
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    Boussioutas, Alex
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    Gregory, Gareth P
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    Hamad, Nada
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    Manos, Kate
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    McKelvie, Penny
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    Ng, Michael
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    Campbell, Belinda
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    Salvaris, Ross
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    Weinkove, Robert
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    Wight, Joel
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    Opat, Stephen
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    Tam, Constantine
    Marginal zone lymphomas (MZLs) are a rare, indolent group of non-Hodgkin lymphomas with different diagnostic, genetic and clinical features and therapeutic implications. The most common is extranodal MZL of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue, followed by splenic MZL and nodal MZL. Patients with MZL generally have good outcomes with long survival rates but frequently have a relapsing/remitting course requiring several lines of therapy. The heterogeneous presentation and relapsing course present the clinician with several diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. This position statement presents evidence-based recommendations in the setting of Australia and New Zealand.
  • Publication
    Journal Article
    Targeting Molecular Measurable Residual Disease and Low-Blast Relapse in AML With Venetoclax and Low-Dose Cytarabine: A Prospective Phase II Study (VALDAC).
    (2024-06-20)
    Tiong, Ing Soo
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    Hiwase, Devendra K
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    Abro, Emad
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    Bajel, Ashish
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    Beligaswatte, Ashanka
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    Reynolds, John
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    Anstee, Natasha
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    Nguyen, Tamia
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    Loo, Sun
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    Chua, Chong Chyn
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    Ashby, Michael
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    Wiltshire, Kaitlyn M
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    Fleming, Shaun
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    Fong, Chun Y
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    Teh, Tse-Chieh
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    Blombery, Piers
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    Dillon, Richard
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    Ivey, Adam
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    Wei, Andrew H
    A prospective phase II study examined the safety and efficacy of venetoclax combined with low-dose cytarabine (LDAC) in AML at first measurable residual disease (MRD) or oligoblastic relapse.Patients with either MRD (≥1 log rise) or oligoblastic relapse (blasts 5%-15%) received venetoclax 600 mg once daily D1-28 plus LDAC once daily D1-10 in 28-day cycles. The primary objective was MRD response in the MRD relapse cohort or complete remission (CR/CRh/CRi) in the oligoblastic relapse cohort.Forty-eight adults with either MRD (n = 26) or oligoblastic (n = 22) relapse were enrolled. Median age was 67 years (range, 18-80) and 94% had received previous intensive chemotherapy. Patients received a median of four cycles of therapy; 17% completed ≥12 cycles. Patients with oligoblastic relapse had more grade ≥3 anemia (32% 4%; = .02) and infections (36% 8%; = .03), whereas grade 4 neutropenia (32 23%) or thrombocytopenia (27 15%) were comparable with the MRD relapse cohort. Markers of molecular MRD relapse included mutant (77%), (4%), (4%), or (4%). Three patients with a log rise in / (12%) were included. By cycle 2 in the MRD relapse cohort, a log reduction in MRD was observed in 69%; 46% achieved MRD negative remission. In the oligoblastic relapse cohort, 73% achieved CR/CRh/CRi. Overall, 21 (44%) underwent hematopoietic cell transplantation. Median overall survival (OS) was not reached in either cohort. Estimated 2-year OS rate was 67% (95% CI, 50 to 89) in the MRD and 53% (95% CI, 34 to 84) in the oligoblastic relapse cohorts.For AML in first remission and either MRD or oligoblastic relapse, venetoclax plus LDAC is well tolerated and highly effective.
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