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  • Publication
    Journal Article
    Timing of tertiary trauma surveys during a time of increased trauma presentations - The Alice Springs Hospital Finke Desert Race experience.
    (2024-05-18)
    Laslett, Kirby
    ;
    Perry, Chris
    ;
    ;
    Coventry, Charles
    The Finke Desert Race is an offroad motorbike and buggy race held annually in central Australia. Owing to the treacherous conditions, this race sees a significant influx of trauma presentations to Alice Springs Hospital, the closest rural hospital. Completion of a tertiary trauma survey (TTS) within 24 hours of a patient's admission is part of standard trauma management.A retrospective analysis was undertaken of trauma presentations managed by general surgery over a 5-day period of the Finke Desert Race weekend, compared to a 3-month control period from February to April of the same year. To be included, patients met the criteria for completion of a TTS.The total number of trauma presentations over the 5-day period of the race weekend was 18 (an incidence rate of 3.6 cases/day), compared to a total of 31 in the 3-month control period (an incidence rate of 0.36 cases/day). The daily rate of major trauma presentations during the Finke race weekend was 9.9 times greater than during the control period. Completion of TTS was missed in only 5.6 % of patients over the Finke weekend, compared to 14.3 % of patients in the control period. The median time from presentation to the emergency department to completion of TTS during the Finke weekend was 20 h 19 min, compared to 20 h 36 min during the control period.Despite the substantial influx of trauma during the race weekend, fewer patients missed having a TTS completed compared to the control period. The median time taken to completion of TTS was similar between the two time periods. These findings suggest that the general surgery department was able to maintain standard trauma management principles.
  • Publication
    Journal Article
    Twenty-four Month Outcomes of Extended- Versus Standard-course Antibiotic Therapy in Children Hospitalized With Pneumonia in High-Risk Settings: A Randomized Controlled Trial.
    (2024-06-03)
    Kok, Hing C
    ;
    McCallum, Gabrielle B
    ;
    Yerkovich, Stephanie T
    ;
    Grimwood, Keith
    ;
    Fong, Siew M
    ;
    Nathan, Anna M
    ;
    Byrnes, Catherine A
    ;
    Ware, Robert S
    ;
    Nachiappan, Nachal
    ;
    Saari, Noorazlina
    ;
    ;
    Yeo, Tsin W
    ;
    Oguoma, Victor M
    ;
    Masters, I Brent
    ;
    de Bruyne, Jessie A
    ;
    Eg, Kah P
    ;
    Lee, Bilawara
    ;
    Ooi, Mong H
    ;
    Upham, John W
    ;
    Torzillo, Paul J
    ;
    Chang, Anne B
    Pediatric community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) can lead to long-term respiratory sequelae, including bronchiectasis. We determined if an extended (13-14 days) versus standard (5-6 days) antibiotic course improves long-term outcomes in children hospitalized with CAP from populations at high risk of chronic respiratory disease.We undertook a multicenter, double-blind, superiority, randomized controlled trial involving 7 Australian, New Zealand, and Malaysian hospitals. Children aged 3 months to ≤5 years hospitalized with radiographic-confirmed CAP who received 1-3 days of intravenous antibiotics, then 3 days of oral amoxicillin-clavulanate, were randomized to either extended-course (8-day oral amoxicillin-clavulanate) or standard-course (8-day oral placebo) arms. Children were reviewed at 12 and 24 months. The primary outcome was children with the composite endpoint of chronic respiratory symptoms/signs (chronic cough at 12 and 24 months; ≥1 subsequent hospitalized acute lower respiratory infection by 24 months; or persistent and/or new chest radiographic signs at 12-months) at 24-months postdischarge, analyzed by intention-to-treat, where children with incomplete follow-up were assumed to have chronic respiratory symptoms/signs ("worst-case" scenario).A total of 324 children were randomized [extended-course (n = 163), standard-course (n = 161)]. For our primary outcome, chronic respiratory symptoms/signs occurred in 97/163 (60%) and 94/161 (58%) children in the extended-courses and standard-courses, respectively [relative risk (RR) = 1.02, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.85-1.22]. Among children where all sub-composite outcomes were known, chronic respiratory symptoms/signs between groups, RR = 1.10, 95% CI: 0.69-1.76 [extended-course = 27/93 (29%) and standard-course = 24/91 (26%)]. Additional sensitivity analyses also revealed no between-group differences.Among children from high-risk populations hospitalized with CAP, 13-14 days of antibiotics (versus 5-6 days), did not improve long-term respiratory outcomes.
  • Publication
    Fact sheet
    Injuries in the Northern Territory, 2020-2022
    (NT Health, 2024-05-31) ;
    Injury is the leading cause of disease burden in the Northern Territory (NT).1 Injury prevention is therefore critical to improve the health of all Territorians. To support injury prevention efforts, this fact sheet explores the incidence, cause, nature and severity of all injury cases admitted to NT public hospitals between 2020 and 2022.
  • Person
  • Organizational Unit
    Physiotherapy
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