Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10137/2677
Title: Within-Host Evolution of Burkholderia pseudomallei during Chronic Infection of Seven Australasian Cystic Fibrosis Patients.
Publication Date: 2017-04-11
Authors: Viberg, Linda T
Sarovich, Derek S
Kidd, Timothy J
Geake, James B
Bell, Scott C
Currie, Bart J
Price, Erin P
Affiliation: Global and Tropical Health Division, Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia..
Global and Tropical Health Division, Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia.. Centre for Animal Health Innovation, Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs, Queensland, Australia..
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.. Centre for Experimental Medicine, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland.. Child Health Research Centre, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia..
Department of Respiratory Medicine, The Lyell McEwin Hospital, Elizabeth Vale, South Australia, Australia..
QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, Queensland, Australia.. Department of Thoracic Medicine, The Prince Charles Hospital, Chermside, Queensland, Australia..
Global and Tropical Health Division, Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia.. Department of Infectious Diseases and Northern Territory Medical Program, Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia..
Global and Tropical Health Division, Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia eprice@usc.edu.au.. Centre for Animal Health Innovation, Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs, Queensland, Australia..
Publication Date: 11-Apr-2017
Abstract: Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disorder characterized by progressive lung function decline. CF patients are at an increased risk of respiratory infections, including those by the environmental bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis. Here, we compared the genomes of B. pseudomallei isolates collected between ~4 and 55 months apart from seven chronically infected CF patients. Overall, the B. pseudomallei strains showed evolutionary patterns similar to those of other chronic infections, including emergence of antibiotic resistance, genome reduction, and deleterious mutations in genes involved in virulence, metabolism, environmental survival, and cell wall components. We documented the first reported B. pseudomallei hypermutators, which were likely caused by defective MutS. Further, our study identified both known and novel molecular mechanisms conferring resistance to three of the five clinically important antibiotics for melioidosis treatment. Our report highlights the exquisite adaptability of microorganisms to long-term persistence in their environment and the ongoing challenges of antibiotic treatment in eradicating pathogens in the CF lung. Convergent evolution with other CF pathogens hints at a degree of predictability in bacterial evolution in the CF lung and potential targeted eradication of chronic CF infections in the future.IMPORTANCEBurkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, is an environmental opportunistic bacterium that typically infects immunocompromised people and those with certain risk factors such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Patients with CF tend to develop chronic melioidosis infections, for reasons that are not well understood. This report is the first to describe B. pseudomallei evolution within the CF lung during chronic infection. We show that the pathways by which B. pseudomallei adapts to the CF lung are similar to those seen in better-studied CF pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Burkholderia cepacia complex species. Adaptations include the accumulation of antibiotic resistance, loss of nonessential genes, metabolic alterations, and virulence factor attenuation. Known and novel mechanisms of resistance to three of the five antibiotics used in melioidosis treatment were identified. Similar pathways of evolution in CF pathogens, including B. pseudomallei, provide exciting avenues for more-targeted treatment of chronic, recalcitrant infections.
Journal title: mBio
Citation: mBio 2017-04-11; 8(2)
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10137/2677
DOI: 10.1128/mBio.00356-17
metadata.dc.identifier.orcid: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-4174-1142
http://orcid.org/0000-0002-6944-3980
http://orcid.org/0000-0002-1079-4882
PubMed: 28400528
Type: Journal Article
Subject: Burkholderia pseudomallei
antibiotic resistance
cystic fibrosis
melioidosis
parallelism
reductive evolution
whole-genome sequencing
within-host evolution
Adaptation, Biological
Australia
Burkholderia pseudomallei
Chronic Disease
Cystic Fibrosis
Evolution, Molecular
Genome, Bacterial
Humans
Melioidosis
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Polymorphism, Genetic
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